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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

("Verschiedenheit im Liebesleben des Weibes und des Mannes," 

_Zeitschrift fuer Sexualwissenschaft_, Dec., 1908), a married man 

who has an unacknowledged child with a woman outside of marriage, 

has committed an act as seriously anti-social as a married woman 

who has a child without acknowledging that the father is not her 

husband. In the first case, the husband, and in the second case, 

the wife, have placed an undue amount of responsibility on 

another person. (The same point is brought forward by the author 

of _The Question of English Divorce_, p. 56.) 

 

I insist here on the economic element in our sexual morality, 

because that is the element which has given it a kind of 

stability and become established in law. But if we take a wider 

view of our sexual morality, we cannot ignore the ancient element 

of asceticism, which has given religious passion and sanction to 

it. Our sexual morality is thus, in reality, a bastard born of 

the union of property-morality with primitive ascetic morality, 

neither in true relationship to the vital facts of the sexual 

life. It is, indeed, the property element which, with a few 

inconsistencies, has become finally the main concern of our law, 

but the ascetic element (with, in the past, a wavering 

relationship to law) has had an important part in moulding 

popular sentiment and in creating an attitude of reprobation 

towards sexual intercourse _per se_, although such intercourse is 

regarded as an essential part of the property-based and 

religiously sanctified institution of legal marriage. 

 

The glorification of virginity led by imperceptible stages to the 

formulation of "fornication" as a deadly sin, and finally as an 

actual secular "crime." It is sometimes stated that it was not 

until the Council of Trent that the Church formally anathematized 

those who held that the state of marriage was higher than that of 

virginity, but the opinion had been more or less formally held 

from almost the earliest ages of Christianity, and is clear in 

the epistles of Paul. All the theologians agree that fornication 

is a mortal sin. Caramuel, indeed, the distinguished Spanish 

theologian, who made unusual concessions to the demands of reason 

and nature, held that fornication is only evil because it is 

forbidden, but Innocent XI formally condemned that proposition. 

Fornication as a mortal sin became gradually secularized into 

fornication as a crime. Fornication was a crime in France even as 

late as the eighteenth century, as Tarde found in his historical 

investigations of criminal procedure in Perigord; adultery was 

also a crime and severely punished quite independently of any 

complaint from either of the parties (Tarde, "Archeologie 

Criminelle en Perigord," _Archives de l'Anthropologie 

Criminelle_, Nov. 15, 1898). 

 

The Puritans of the Commonwealth days in England (like the 

Puritans of Geneva) followed the Catholic example and adopted 

ecclesiastical offences against chastity into the secular law. By 

an Act passed in 1653 fornication became punishable by three 

months' imprisonment inflicted on both parties. By the same Act 

the adultery of a wife (nothing is said of a husband) was made 

felony, both for her and her partner in guilt, and therefore 

punishable by death (Scobell, _Acts and Ordinances_, p. 121). 

 

 

 

 


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