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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

fact that the payment seems larger, that in return for rendering certain 

domestic services and certain personal complacencies--services and 

complacencies in which she may be quite inexpert--she will secure an 

almshouse in which she will be fed and clothed and sheltered for life 

makes no difference in the moral aspect of her case. The moral 

responsibility is, it need scarcely be said, at least as much the man's as 

the woman's. It is largely due to the ignorance and even the indifference 

of men, who often know little or nothing of the nature of women and the 

art of love. The unintelligence with which even men who might, one thinks, 

be not without experience, select as a mate, a woman who, however fine and 

charming she may be, possesses none of the qualities which her wooer 

really craves, is a perpetual marvel. To refrain from testing and proving 

the temper and quality of the woman he desires for a mate is no doubt an 

amiable trait of humility on a man's part. But it is certain that a man 

should never be content with less than the best of what a woman's soul and 

body have to give, however unworthy he may feel himself of such a 

possession. This demand, it must be remarked, is in the highest interests 

of the woman herself. A woman can offer to a man what is a part at all 

events of the secret of the universe. The woman degrades herself who sinks 

to the level of a candidate for an asylum for the destitute. 

 

Our discussion of the psychic facts of sex has thus, it will be seen, 

brought us up to the question of morality. Over and over again, in 

setting forth the phenomena of prostitution, it has been necessary to use 

the word "moral." That word, however, is vague and even, it may be, 

misleading because it has several senses. So far, it has been left to the 

intelligent reader, as he will not fail to perceive, to decide from the 

context in what sense the word was used. But at the present point, before 

we proceed to discuss sexual psychology in relation to marriage, it is 

necessary, in order to avoid ambiguity, to remind the reader what 

precisely are the chief main senses in which the word "morality" is 

commonly used. 

 

The morality with which ethical treatises are concerned is _theoretical 

morality_. It is concerned with what people "ought"--or what is "right" 

for them--to do. Socrates in the Platonic dialogues was concerned with 

such theoretical morality: what "ought" people to seek in their actions? 

The great bulk of ethical literature, until recent times one may say the 

whole of it, is concerned with that question. Such theoretical morality 

is, as Sidgwick said, a study rather than a science, for science can only 

be based on what is, not on what ought to be. 

 

Even within the sphere of theoretical morality there are two very 

different kinds of morality, so different indeed that sometimes each 

regards the other as even inimical or at best only by courtesy, with yet a 

shade of contempt, "moral." These two kinds of theoretical morality are 

_traditional morality_ and _ideal morality_. Traditional morality is 

founded on the long established practices of a community and possesses the 

stability of all theoretical ideas based in the past social life and 

surrounding every individual born into the community from his earliest 

years. It becomes the voice of conscience which speaks automatically in 

favor of all the rules that are thus firmly fixed, even when the 

individual himself no longer accepts them. Many persons, for example, who 

were brought up in childhood to the Puritanical observance of Sunday, will 

recall how, long after they had ceased to believe that such observances 


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