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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

first. The man that gratifies his appetite after the manner the 

custom of the country allows of, has no censure to fear. If he 

is hotter than goats or bulls, as soon as the ceremony is over, 

let him sate and fatigue himself with joy and ecstasies of 

pleasure, raise and indulge his appetite by turns, as 

extravagantly as his strength and manhood will give him leave. He 

may, with safety, laugh at the wise men that should reprove him: 

all the women and above nine in ten of the men are of his side; 

nay, he has the liberty of valuing himself upon the fury of his 

unbridled passions, and the more he wallows in lust and strains 

every faculty to be abandonedly voluptuous, the sooner he shall 

have the good-will and gain the affection of the women, not the 

young, vain, and lascivious only, but the prudent, grave, and 

most sober matrons." 

 

Thus the charge brought against our marriage system from the 

point of view of morality is that it subordinates the sexual 

relationship to considerations of money and of lust. That is 

precisely the essence of prostitution. 

 

The only legitimately moral end of marriage--whether we regard it from the 

wider biological standpoint or from the narrower standpoint of human 

society--is as a sexual selection, effected in accordance with the laws of 

sexual selection, and having as its direct object a united life of 

complete mutual love and as its indirect object the procreation of the 

race. Unless procreation forms part of the object of marriage, society has 

nothing whatever to do with it and has no right to make its voice heard. 

But if procreation is one of the ends of marriage, then it is imperative 

from the biological and social points of view that no influences outside 

the proper natural influence of sexual selection should be permitted to 

affect the choice of conjugal partners, for in so far as wholesome sexual 

selection is interfered with the offspring is likely to be injured and the 

interests of the race affected. 

 

It must, of course, be clearly understood that the idea of 

marriage as a form of sexual union based not on biological but on 

economic considerations, is very ancient, and is sometimes found 

in societies that are almost primitive. Whenever, however, 

marriage on a purely property basis, and without due regard to 

sexual selection, has occurred among comparatively primitive and 

vigorous peoples, it has been largely deprived of its evil 

results by the recognition of its merely economic character, and 

by the absence of any desire to suppress, even nominally, other 

sexual relationships on a more natural basis which were outside 

this artificial form of marriage. Polygamy especially tended to 

conciliate unions on an economic basis with unions on a natural 

sexual basis. Our modern marriage system has, however, acquired 

an artificial rigidity which excludes the possibility of this 

natural safeguard and compensation. Whatever its real moral 

content may be, a modern marriage is always "legal" and "sacred." 

We are indeed so accustomed to economic forms of marriage that, 

as Sidgwick truly observed (_Method of Ethics_, Bk. ii, Ch. XI), 

when they are spoken of as "legalized prostitution" it constantly 

happens that "the phrase is felt to be extravagant and 

paradoxical." 

 

A man who marries for money or for ambition is departing from the 

biological and moral ends of marriage. A woman who sells herself for life 

is morally on the same level as one who sells herself for a night. The 


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