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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

XIII-XV. How ineffectual the system of police regulation is, even in 

Germany, where police interference is tolerated to so marked a degree, may 

be illustrated by the case of Mannheim. Here the regulation of 

prostitution is very severe and thorough, yet a careful inquiry in 1905 

among the doctors of Mannheim (ninety-two of whom sent in detailed 

returns) showed that of six hundred cases of venereal disease in men, 

nearly half had been contracted from prostitutes. About half the remaining 

cases (nearly a quarter of the whole) were due to waitresses and 

bar-maids; then followed servant-girls (Lion and Loeb, in 

_Sexualpaedagogik_, the Proceedings of the Third German Congress for 

Combating Venereal Diseases, 1907, p. 295). 

 

[240] A sixth less numerous class might be added of the young girls, often 

no more than children, who have been practically raped by men who believe 

that intercourse with a virgin is a cure for obstinate venereal disease. 

In America this belief is frequently held by Italians, Chinese, negroes, 

etc. W. Travis Gibb, Examining Physician of the New York Society for the 

Prevention of Cruelty to Children, has examined over 900 raped children 

(only a small proportion, he states, of the cases actually occurring), and 

finds that thirteen per cent have venereal diseases. A fairly large 

proportion of these cases, among girls from twelve to sixteen, are, he 

states, willing victims. Dr. Flora Pollack, also, of the Johns Hopkins 

Hospital Dispensary, estimates that in Baltimore alone from 800 to 1,000 

children between the ages of one and fifteen are venereally infected every 

year. The largest number, she finds, is at the age of six, and the chief 

cause appears to be, not lust, but superstition. 

 

[241] For a discussion of inherited syphilis, see, e.g., Clement Lucas, 

_Lancet_, February 1, 1908. 

 

[242] Much harm has been done in some countries by the foolish and 

mischievous practice of friendly societies and sick clubs of ignoring 

venereal diseases, and not according free medical aid or sick pay to those 

members who suffer from them. This practice prevailed, for instance, in 

Vienna until 1907, when a more humane and enlightened policy was 

inaugurated, venereal diseases being placed on the same level as other 

diseases. 

 

[243] Active measures against venereal disease were introduced in Sweden 

early in the last century, and compulsory and gratuitous treatment 

established. Compulsory notification was introduced many years ago in 

Norway, and by 1907 there was a great diminution in the prevalence of 

venereal diseases; there is compulsory treatment. 

 

[244] See, e.g., Morrow, _Social Diseases and Marriage_, Ch. XXXVII. 

 

[245] A committee of the Medical Society of New York, appointed in 1902 to 

consider this question, reported in favor of notification without giving 

names and addresses, and Dr. C.R. Drysdale, who took an active part in the 

Brussels International Conference of 1899, advocated a similar plan in 

England, _British Medical Journal_, February 3, 1900. 

 

[246] Thus in Munich, in 1908, a man who had given gonorrhoea to a 

servant-girl was sent to prison for ten months on this ground. The state 

of German opinion to-day on this subject is summarized by Bloch, 

_Sexualleben unserer Zeit_, p. 424. 

 

[247] A. Despres, _La Prostitution a Paris_, p. 191. 

 

[248] F. Aurientis, _Etude Medico-legale sur la jurisprudence actuelle a 

propos de la Transmission des Maladies Veneriennes_, These de Paris, 1906. 

 

[249] In England at present "a husband knowingly and wilfully infecting 

his wife with the venereal disease, cannot be convicted criminally, either 


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