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THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

they received, in the gift of syphilis, the full benefit of civilization 

and Christianity, which (Lambkin points out) has been largely the cause of 

the spread of the disease by breaking down social customs and emancipating 

the women. Christianity is powerful enough to break down the old morality, 

but not powerful enough to build up a new morality (_British Medical 

Journal_, October 3, 1908, p. 1037). 

 

[230] Even within the limits of the English army it is found In India 

(H.C. French, _Syphilis in the Army_, 1907) that venereal disease is ten 

times more frequent among British troops than among Native troops. Outside 

of national armies it is found, by admission to hospital and death rates, 

that the United States stands far away at the head for frequency of 

venereal disease, being followed by Great Britain, then France and 

Austria-Hungary, Russia, and Germany. 

 

[231] There is no dispute concerning the antiquity of gonorrhoea in the 

Old World as there is regarding syphilis. The disease was certainly known 

at a very remote period. Even Esarhaddon, the famous King of Assyria, 

referred to in the Old Testament, was treated by the priests for a 

disorder which, as described in the cuneiform documents of the time, could 

only have been gonorrhoea. The disease was also well known to the ancient 

Egyptians, and evidently common, for they recorded many prescriptions for 

its treatment (Oefele, "Gonorrhoe 1350 vor Christi Geburt," _Monatshefte 

fuer Praktische Dermatologie_, 1899, p. 260). 

 

[232] Cf. Memorandum by Sydney Stephenson, Report of Ophthalmia Neonatorum 

Committee, _British Medical Journal_, May 8, 1909. 

 

[233] The extent of these evils is set forth, e.g., in a comprehensive 

essay by Taylor, _American Journal Obstetrics_, January, 1908. 

 

[234] Neisser brings together figures bearing on the prevalence of 

gonorrhoea in Germany, Senator and Kaminer, _Health and Disease in 

Relation to Marriage_, vol. ii, pp. 486-492. 

 

[235] _Lancet_, September 23, 1882. As regards women, Dr. Frances Ivens 

(_British Medical Journal_, June 19, 1909) has found at Liverpool that 14 

per cent. of gynaecological cases revealed the presence of gonorrhoea. They 

were mostly poor respectable married women. This is probably a high 

proportion, as Liverpool is a busy seaport, but it is less than Saenger's 

estimate of 18 per cent. 

 

[236] E.H. Grandin, _Medical Record_, May 26, 1906. 

 

[237] E.W. Cushing, "Sociological Aspects of Gonorrhoea," _Transactions 

American Gynecological Society_, vol. xxii, 1897. 

 

[238] It is only in very small communities ruled by an autocratic power 

with absolute authority to control conditions and to examine persons of 

both sexes that reglementation becomes in any degree effectual. This is 

well shown by Dr. W.E. Harwood, who describes the system he organized in 

the mines of the Minnesota Iron Company (_Journal American Medical 

Association_, December 22, 1906). The women in the brothels on the 

company's estate were of the lowest class, and disease was very prevalent. 

Careful examination of the women was established, and control of the men, 

who, immediately on becoming diseased, were bound to declare by what woman 

they had been infected. The woman was responsible for the medical bill of 

the man she infected, and even for his board, if incapacitated, and the 

women were compelled to maintain a fund for their own hospital expenses 

when required. In this way venereal disease, though not entirely uprooted, 

was very greatly diminished. 

 

[239] A clear and comprehensive statement of the present position of the 

question is given by Iwan Bloch, _Das Sexualleben Unserer Zeit_, Chs. 


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