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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

even obloquy. But I supposed that a secluded student who approached vital 

social problems with precaution, making no direct appeal to the general 

public, but only to the public's teachers, and who wrapped up the results 

of his inquiries in technically written volumes open to few, I supposed 

that such a student was at all events secure from any gross form of attack 

on the part of the police or the government under whose protection he 

imagined that he lived. That proved to be a mistake. When only one volume 

of these _Studies_ had been written and published in England, a 

prosecution, instigated by the government, put an end to the sale of that 

volume in England, and led me to resolve that the subsequent volumes 

should not be published in my own country. I do not complain. I am 

grateful for the early and generous sympathy with which my work was 

received in Germany and the United States, and I recognize that it has had 

a wider circulation, both in English and the other chief languages of the 

world, than would have been possible by the modest method of issue which 

the government of my own country induced me to abandon. Nor has the effort 

to crush my work resulted in any change in that work by so much as a 

single word. With help, or without it, I have followed my own path to the 

end. 

 

For it so happens that I come on both sides of my house from stocks of 

Englishmen who, nearly three hundred years ago, had encountered just these 

same difficulties and dangers before. In the seventeenth century, indeed, 

the battle was around the problem of religion, as to-day it is around the 

problem of sex. Since I have of late years realized this analogy I have 

often thought of certain admirable and obscure men who were driven out, 

robbed, and persecuted, some by the Church because the spirit of 

Puritanism moved within them, some by the Puritans because they clung to 

the ideals of the Church, yet both alike quiet and unflinching, both alike 

fighting for causes of freedom or of order in a field which has now for 

ever been won. That victory has often seemed of good augury to the perhaps 

degenerate child of these men who has to-day sought to maintain the causes 

of freedom and of order in another field. 

 

It sometimes seems, indeed, a hopeless task to move the pressure of inert 

prejudices which are at no point so obstinate as this of sex. It may help 

to restore the serenity of our optimism if we would more clearly realize 

that in a very few generations all these prejudices will have perished and 

be forgotten. He who follows in the steps of Nature after a law that was 

not made by man, and is above and beyond man, has time as well as eternity 

on his side, and can afford to be both patient and fearless. Men die, but 

the ideas they seek to kill live. Our books may be thrown to the flames, 

but in the next generation those flames become human souls. The 

transformation is effected by the doctor in his consulting room, by the 

teacher in the school, the preacher in the pulpit, the journalist in the 

press. It is a transformation that is going on, slowly but surely, around 

us. 

 

I am well aware that many will not feel able to accept the estimate of the 

sexual situation as here set forth, more especially in the final volume. 

Some will consider that estimate too conservative, others too 

revolutionary. For there are always some who passionately seek to hold 

fast to the past; there are always others who passionately seek to snatch 

at what they imagine to be the future. But the wise man, standing midway 

between both parties and sympathizing with each, knows that we are ever in 


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