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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

have not yet received the attention they deserve. They are, 

however, confirmed by many general tendencies which are now 

fairly well recognized. The significant fact is known, for 

instance, that in mothers over thirty, the proportion of 

abortions and miscarriages is twice as great as in mothers 

between the ages of fifteen and twenty, who also are superior in 

this respect to mothers between the ages of twenty and thirty 

(_Statistischer Jahrbuch_, Budapest, 1905). It was, again, proved 

by Matthews Duncan, in his Goulstonian lecture, that the chances 

of sterility in a woman increase with increase of age. It has, 

further, been shown (Kisch, _Sexual Life of Woman_, Part II) that 

the older a woman at marriage, the greater the average interval 

before the first delivery, a tendency which seems to indicate 

that it is the very young woman who is in the condition most apt 

for procreation; Kisch is not, indeed, inclined to think that 

this applies to women below twenty, but the fact, observed by 

other obstetricians, that mothers under eighteen tend to become 

pregnant again at an unusually short interval, goes far to 

neutralize the exception made by Kisch. It may also be pointed 

out that, among children of very young mothers, the sexes are 

more nearly equal in number than is the case with older mothers. 

This would seem to indicate that we are here in presence of a 

normal equilibrium which will decrease as the age of the mother 

is progressively disturbed in an abnormal direction. 

 

The facility of parturition at an early age, it may be noted, 

corresponds to an equal facility in physical sexual intercourse, 

a fact that is often overlooked. In Russia, where marriage still 

takes place early, it was formerly common when the woman was only 

twelve or thirteen, and Guttceit (_Dreissig Jahre Praxis_, vol. 

i, p. 324) says that he was assured by women who married at this 

age that the first coitus presented no especial difficulties. 

 

There is undoubtedly, at the present time, a considerable amount 

of prejudice against early motherhood. In part, this is due to a 

failure to realize that women are sexually much more precocious 

than men, physically as well as psychically (see _ante_ p. 35). 

The difference is about five years. This difference has been 

virtually recognized for thousands of years, in the ancient 

belief that the age of election for procreation is about twenty, 

or less, for women, but about twenty-five for men; and it has 

more lately been affirmed by the discovery that, while the male 

is never capable of generation before thirteen, the female may, 

in occasional instances, become pregnant at eight. (Some of the 

recorded examples are quoted by Kisch.) In part, also, there is 

an objection to the assumption of responsibilities so serious as 

those of motherhood by a young girl, and there is the very 

reasonable feeling that the obligations of a permanent marriage 

tie ought not to be undertaken at an early age. On the other 

hand, apart from the physical advantages, as regards both mother 

and infant, on the side of early pregnancies, it is an advantage 

for the child to have a young mother, who can devote herself 

sympathetically and unreservedly to its interests, instead of 

presenting the pathetic spectacle we so often witness in the 

middle-aged woman who turns to motherhood when her youth and 

mental flexibility are gone, and her habits and tastes have 

settled into other grooves; it has sometimes been a great 


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