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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

sometimes required special care during the first few days after 

birth, perhaps because labor in these cases is sometimes slow. 

The recovery of the mother was, in every case, absolutely normal, 

and the fact that these young mothers become pregnant again more 

readily than primiparae of a more mature age, further contributes 

to show that childbirth below the age of sixteen is in no way 

injurious to the mother. Gache (_Annales de Gynecologie et 

d'Obstetrique_, Dec., 1904) has attended ninety-one labors of 

mothers under seventeen, in the Rawson Hospital, Buenos Ayres; 

they were of so-called Latin race, mostly Spanish or Italian. 

Gache found that these young mothers were by no means more 

exposed than others to abortion or to other complications of 

pregnancy. Except in four cases of slightly contracted pelvis, 

delivery was normal, though rather longer than in older 

primiparae. Damage to the soft parts was, however, rare, and, when 

it occurred, in every case rapidly healed. The average weight of 

the child was 3,039 grammes, or nearly 63/4 pounds. It may be noted 

that most observers find that very early pregnancies occur in 

women who begin to menstruate at an unusually early age, that is, 

some years before the early pregnancy occurs. 

 

It is clear, however, that young mothers do remarkably well, 

while there is no doubt whatever that they bear unusually fine 

infants. Kleinwaechter, indeed, found that the younger the mother, 

the bigger the child. It is not only physically that the children 

of young mothers are superior. Marro has found (_Puberta_, p. 

257) that the children of mothers under 21 are superior to those 

of older mothers both in conduct and intelligence, provided the 

fathers are not too old or too young. The detailed records of 

individual cases confirm these results, both as regards mother 

and child. Thus, Milner (_Lancet_, June 7, 1902) records a case 

of pregnancy in a girl of fourteen; the labor pains were very 

mild, and delivery was easy. E.B. Wales, of New Jersey, has 

recorded the history (reproduced in _Medical Reprints_, Sept. 15, 

1890) of a colored girl who became pregnant at the age of eleven. 

She was of medium size, rather tall and slender, but well 

developed, and began to menstruate at the age of ten. She was in 

good health and spirits during pregnancy, and able to work. 

Delivery was easy and natural, not notably prolonged, and 

apparently not unduly painful, for there were no moans or 

agitation. The child was a fine, healthy boy, weighing not less 

than eleven pounds. Mother and child both did well, and there was 

a great flow of milk. Whiteside Robertson (_British Medical 

Journal_, Jan. 18, 1902) has recorded a case of pregnancy at the 

age of thirteen, in a Colonial girl of British origin in Cape 

Colony, which is notable from other points of view. During 

pregnancy, she was anaemic, and appeared to be of poor development 

and doubtfully normal pelvic conformation. Yet delivery took 

place naturally, at full term, without difficulty or injury, and 

the lying-in period was in every way satisfactory. The baby was 

well-proportioned, and weighed 71/2 pounds. "I have rarely seen a 

primipara enjoy easier labor," concluded Robertson, "and I have 

never seen one look forward to the happy realization of 

motherhood with greater satisfaction." 

 

The facts brought forward by obstetricians concerning the good 

results of early pregnancy, as regards both mother and child, 


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