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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

When sterility is due to a defect in the husband's spermatozoa, 

and is not discovered, as it usually might be, before marriage, 

the question of impregnating the wife by other methods has 

occasionally arisen. Divorce on the ground of sterility is not 

possible, and, even if it were, the couple, although they wish to 

have a child, have not usually any wish to separate. Under these 

circumstances, in order to secure the desired end, without 

departing from widely accepted rules of morality, the attempt is 

occasionally made to effect artificial fecundation by injecting 

the semen from a healthy male. Attempts have been made to effect 

artificial fecundation by various distinguished men, from John 

Hunter to Schwalbe, but it is nearly always very difficult to 

effect, and often impossible. This is easy to account for, if we 

recall what has already been pointed out (_ante_ p. 577) 

concerning the influence of erotic excitement in the woman in 

securing conception; it is obviously a serious task for even the 

most susceptible woman to evoke erotic enthusiasm _a propos_ of a 

medical syringe. Schwalbe, for instance, records a case 

(_Deutsche Medizinisches Wochenschrift_, Aug., 1908, p. 510) in 

which,--in consequence of the husband's sterility and the wife's 

anxiety, with her husband's consent, to be impregnated by the 

semen of another man,--he made repeated careful attempts to 

effect artificial fecundation; these attempts were, however, 

fruitless, and the three parties concerned finally resigned 

themselves to the natural method of intercourse, which was 

successful. In another case, recorded by Schwalbe, in which the 

husband was impotent but not sterile, six attempts were made to 

effect artificial fecundation, and further efforts abandoned on 

account of the disgust of all concerned. 

 

Opinion, on the whole, has been opposed to the practice of 

artificial fecundation, even apart from the question of the 

probabilities of success. Thus, in France, where there is a 

considerable literature on the subject, the Paris Medical 

Faculty, in 1885, after some hesitation, refused Gerard's thesis 

on the history of artificial fecundation, afterwards published 

independently. In 1883, the Bordeaux legal tribunal declared that 

artificial fecundation was illegitimate, and a social danger. In 

1897, the Holy See also pronounced that the practice is unlawful 

("Artificial Fecundation before the Inquisition," _British 

Medical Journal_, March 5, 1898). Apart, altogether, from this 

attitude of medicine, law, and Church, it would certainly seem 

that those who desire offspring would do well, as a rule, to 

adopt the natural method, which is also the best, or else to 

abandon to others the task of procreation, for which they are not 

adequately equipped. 

 

When we have ascertained that two individuals both belong to sound and 

healthy stocks, and, further, that they are themselves both apt for 

procreation, it still remains to consider the conditions under which they 

may best effect procreation.[462] There arises, for instance, the 

question, often asked, What is the best age for procreation? 

 

The considerations which weigh in answering this question are of two 

different orders, physiological, and social or moral. That is to say, that 

it is necessary, on the one hand, that physical maturity should have been 

fully attained, and the sexual cells completely developed; while, on the 

other hand, it is necessary that the man shall have become able to support 

a family, and that both partners shall have received a training in life 


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