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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

engagement was finally concluded each party placed himself or herself in 

the hands of a physician and authorized him to report to the other party. 

Such a report would extend far beyond venereal disease. If its necessity 

became generally recognized it would put an end to much fraud which now 

takes place when entering the marriage bond. It constantly happens at 

present that one party or the other conceals the existence of some serious 

disease or disability which is speedily discovered after marriage, 

sometimes with a painful and alarming shock--as when a man discovers his 

wife in an epileptic fit on the wedding night--and always with the bitter 

and abiding sense of having been duped. There can be no reasonable doubt 

that such concealment is an adequate cause of divorce. Sir Thomas More 

doubtless sought to guard against such frauds when he ordained in his 

_Utopia_ that each party should before marriage be shown naked to the 

other. The quaint ceremony he describes was based on a reasonable idea, 

for it is ludicrous, if it were not often tragic in its results, that any 

person should be asked to undertake to embrace for life a person whom he 

or she has not so much as seen. 

 

It may be necessary to point out that every movement in this direction 

must be the spontaneous action of individuals directing their own lives 

according to the rules of an enlightened conscience, and cannot be 

initiated by the dictation of the community as a whole enforcing its 

commands by law. In these matters law can only come in at the end, not at 

the beginning. In the essential matters of marriage and procreation laws 

are primarily made in the brains and consciences of individuals for their 

own guidance. Unless such laws are already embodied in the actual practice 

of the great majority of the community it is useless for parliaments to 

enact them by statute. They will be ineffective or else they will be worse 

than ineffective by producing undesigned mischiefs. We can only go to the 

root of the matter by insisting on education in moral responsibility and 

instruction, in matters of fact. 

 

The question arises as to the best person to impart this instruction. As 

we have seen there can be little doubt that before puberty the parents, 

and especially the mother, are the proper instructors of their children in 

esoteric knowledge. But after puberty the case is altered. The boy and the 

girl are becoming less amenable to parental influence, there is greater 

shyness on both sides, and the parents rarely possess the more technical 

knowledge that is now required. At this stage it seems that the assistance 

of the physician, of the family doctor if he has the proper qualities for 

the task, should be called in. The plan usually adopted, and now widely 

carried out, is that of lectures setting forth the main facts concerning 

venereal diseases, their dangers, and allied topics.[254] This method is 

quite excellent. Such lectures should be delivered at intervals by medical 

lecturers at all urban, educational, manufacturing, military, and naval 

centres, wherever indeed a large number of young persons are gathered 

together. It should be the business of the central educational authority 

either to carry them out or to enforce on those controlling or employing 

young persons the duty of providing such lectures. The lectures should be 

free to all who have attained the age of sixteen. 

 

 

In Germany the principle of instruction by lectures concerning 

venereal diseases seems to have become established, at all events 

so far as young men are concerned, and such lectures are 

constantly becoming more usual. In 1907 the Minister of Education 


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