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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

is not dispensed from the necessity of such inquiry concerning her future 

husband by the conviction that the reply must surely be satisfactory. 

Moreover, it may well be in some cases that, if she is adequately 

enlightened, she may be the means of saving him, before it is too late, 

from the guilt of premature marriage and its fateful consequences, so 

deserving to earn his everlasting gratitude. Even if she fails in winning 

that, she still has her duty to herself and to the future race which her 

children will help to form. 

 

In most countries there is a growing feeling in favor of the 

enlightenment of young women equally with young men as regards 

venereal diseases. Thus in Germany Max Flesch, in his 

_Prostitution und Frauenkrankheiten_, considers that at the end 

of their school days all girls should receive instruction 

concerning the grave physical and social dangers to which women 

are exposed in life. In France Duclaux (in his _L'Hygiene 

Sociale_) is emphatic that women must be taught. "Already," he 

states, "doctors who by custom have been made, in spite of 

themselves, the husband's accomplices, will tell you of the 

ironical gaze they sometimes encounter when they seek to lead a 

wife astray concerning the causes of her ills. The day is 

approaching of a revolt against the social lie which has made so 

many victims, and you will be obliged to teach women what they 

need to know in order to guard themselves against you." It is the 

same in America. Reform in this field, Isidore Dyer declares, 

must emblazon on its flag the motto, "Knowledge is Health," as 

well of mind as of body, for women as well as for men. In a 

discussion introduced by Denslow Lewis at the annual meeting of 

the American Medical Association in 1901 on the limitation of 

venereal diseases (_Medico-Legal Journal_, June and September, 

1903), there was a fairly general agreement among all the 

speakers that almost or quite the chief method of prevention lay 

in education, the education of women as much as of men. 

"Education lies at the bottom of the whole thing," declared one 

speaker (Seneca Egbert, of Philadelphia), "and we will never gain 

much headway until every young man, and every young woman, even 

before she falls in love and becomes engaged, knows what these 

diseases are, and what it will mean if she marries a man who has 

contracted them." "Educate father and mother, and they will 

educate their sons and daughters," exclaims Egbert Grandin, more 

especially in regard to gonorrhoea (_Medical Record_, May 26, 

1906); "I lay stress on the daughter because she becomes the 

chief sufferer from inoculation, and it is her right to know that 

she should protect herself against the gonorrhoeic as well as 

against the alcoholic." 

 

We must fully face the fact that it is the woman herself who must be 

accounted responsible, as much as a man, for securing the right conditions 

of a marriage she proposes to enter into. In practice, at the outset, that 

responsibility may no doubt be in part delegated to parents or guardians. 

It is unreasonable that any false delicacy should be felt about this 

matter on either side. Questions of money and of income are discussed 

before marriage, and as public opinion grows sounder none will question 

the necessity of discussing the still more serious question of health, 

alike that of the prospective bridegroom and of the bride. An incalculable 

amount of disease and marital unhappiness would be prevented if before an 


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