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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

conviction of this necessity is becoming scarcely less pronounced in all 

other civilized countries, in England and America as much as in France and 

the Scandinavian lands. 

 

A knowledge of the risks of disease by sexual intercourse, both in and out 

of marriage,--and indeed, apart from sexual intercourse altogether,--is a 

further stage of that sexual education which, as we have already seen, 

must begin, so far as the elements are concerned, at a very early age. 

Youths and girls should be taught, as the distinguished Austrian 

economist, Anton von Menger wrote, shortly before his death, in his 

excellent little book, _Neue Sittenlehre_, that the production of children 

is a crime when the parents are syphilitic or otherwise incompetent 

through transmissible chronic diseases. Information about venereal disease 

should not indeed be given until after puberty is well established. It is 

unnecessary and undesirable to impart medical knowledge to young boys and 

girls and to warn them against risks they are yet little liable to be 

exposed to. It is when the age of strong sexual instinct, actual or 

potential, begins that the risks, under some circumstances, of yielding to 

it, need to be clearly present to the mind. No one who reflects on the 

actual facts of life ought to doubt that it is in the highest degree 

desirable that every adolescent youth and girl ought to receive some 

elementary instruction in the general facts of venereal disease, 

tuberculosis, and alcoholism. These three "plagues of civilization" are so 

widespread, so subtle and manifold in their operation, that everyone comes 

in contact with them during life, and that everyone is liable to suffer, 

even before he is aware, perhaps hopelessly and forever, from the results 

of that contact. Vague declamation about immorality and vaguer warnings 

against it have no effect and possess no meaning, while rhetorical 

exaggeration is unnecessary. A very simple and concise statement of the 

actual facts concerning the evils that beset life is quite sufficient and 

adequate, and quite essential. To ignore this need is only possible to 

those who take a dangerously frivolous view of life. 

 

It is the young woman as much as the youth who needs this enlightenment. 

There are still some persons so ill-informed as to believe that though it 

may be necessary to instruct the youth it is best to leave his sister 

unsullied, as they consider it, by a knowledge of the facts of life. This 

is the very reverse of the truth. It is desirable indeed that all should 

be acquainted with facts so vital to humanity, even although not 

themselves personally concerned. But the girl is even more concerned than 

the youth. A man has the matter more within his own grasp, and if he so 

chooses he may avoid all the grosser risks of contact with venereal 

disease. But it is not so with the woman. Whatever her own purity, she 

cannot be sure that she may not have to guard against the possibility of 

disease in her future husband as well as in those to whom she may entrust 

her child. It is a possibility which the educated woman, so far from 

being dispensed from, is more liable to encounter than is the 

working-class woman, for venereal disease is less prevalent among the poor 

than the rich.[253] The careful physician, even when his patient is a 

minister of religion, considers it his duty to inquire if he has had 

syphilis, and the clergyman of most severely correct life recognizes the 

need of such inquiry and may perhaps smile, but seldom feels himself 

insulted. The relationship between husband and wife is even much more 

intimate and important than that between doctor and patient, and a woman 


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