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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

belong to good stocks, nor is even the fact that a man and a woman are 

fertile with other persons any positive proof that they will be fertile 

with each other. Among the large masses of the population who do not seek 

to make their unions legal until those unions have proved fertile, this 

difficulty is settled in a simple and practical manner. The question is, 

however, a serious and hazardous one, in the present state of the marriage 

law in most countries, for those classes which are accustomed to bind 

themselves in legal marriage without any knowledge of their potency and 

fertility with each other. The matter is mostly left to chance, and as 

legal marriage cannot usually be dissolved on the ground that there are no 

offspring, even although procreation is commonly declared to be the chief 

end of marriage, the question assumes much gravity. The ordinary range of 

sterility is from seven to fifteen per cent. of all marriages, and in a 

very large proportion of these it is a source of great concern. This could 

be avoided, in some measure, by examination before marriage, and almost 

altogether by ordaining that, as it is only through offspring that a 

marriage has any concern for the State, a legal marriage could be 

dissolved, after a certain period, at the will of either of the parties, 

in the absence of such offspring. 

 

It was formerly supposed that when a union proved infertile, it 

was the wife who was at fault. That belief is long since 

exploded, but, even yet, a man is generally far more concerned 

about his potency, that is, his ability to perform the mechanical 

act of coitus, than about his fertility, that is, his ability to 

produce living spermatozoa, though the latter condition is a much 

more common source of sterility. "Any man," says Arthur Cooper 

(_British Medical Journal_, May 11, 1907), "who has any sexual 

defect or malformation, or who has suffered from any disease or 

injury of the genito-urinary organs, even though comparatively 

trivial or one-sided, and although his copulative power may be 

unimpaired, should be looked upon as possibly sterile, until some 

sort of evidence to the contrary has been obtained." In case of a 

sterile marriage, the possible cause should first be investigated 

in the husband, for it is comparatively easy to examine the 

semen, and to ascertain if it contains active spermatozoa. 

Prinzing, in a comprehensive study of sterile marriages ("Die 

Sterilen Ehen," _Zeitschrift fuer Sozialwissenschaft_, 1904, Heft 

1 and 2), states that in two-fifths of sterile marriages the man 

is at fault; one-third of such marriages are the result of 

venereal diseases in the husband himself, or transmitted to the 

wife. Gonorrhoea is not now considered so important a cause of 

sterility as it was a few years ago; Schenk makes it responsible 

for only about thirteen per cent. sterile marriages (cf. Kisch, 

_The Sexual Life of Woman_). Pinkus (_Archiv fuer Gynaekologie_, 

1907) found that of nearly five hundred cases in which he 

examined both partners, in 24.4 per cent. cases, the sterility 

was directly due to the husband, and in 15.8 per cent. cases, 

indirectly due, because caused by gonorrhoea with which he had 

infected his wife. 

 

 


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