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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

not broken off the resolve is often made to avoid procreation. 

Clouston, who emphasizes (_Hygiene of the Mind_, p. 74) the 

importance of "inquiries by each of the parties to the 

life-contract, by their parents and their doctors, as to 

heredity, temperament, and health," is more hopeful of the 

results than Urquhart. "I have been very much impressed, of late 

years," he writes (_Journal of Mental Science_, Oct., 1907, p. 

710), "with the way in which this subject is taking possession of 

intelligent people, by the number of times one is consulted by 

young men and young women, proposing to marry, or by their 

fathers or mothers. I used to have the feeling in the back of my 

mind, when I was consulted, that it did not matter what I said, 

it would not make any difference. But it is making a difference; 

and I, and others, could tell of scores of marriages which were 

put off in consequence of psychiatric medical advice." 

 

Ellen Key, also, refers to the growing tendency among both men 

and women, to be influenced by eugenic consideration in forming 

partnerships for life (_Century of the Child_, Ch. I). The 

recognition of the eugenic attitude towards marriage, the 

quickening of the social and individual conscience in matters of 

heredity, as also the systematic introduction of certification 

and registration, will be furthered by the growing tendency to 

the socialization of medicine, and, indeed, in its absence would 

be impossible. (See e.g., Havelock Ellis, _The Nationalization of 

Health_.) The growth of the State Medical Organization of Health 

is steady and continuous, and is constantly covering a larger 

field. The day of the private practitioner of medicine--who was 

treated, as Duclaux (_L'Hygiene Sociale_, p. 263) put it, "like a 

grocer, whose shop the customer may enter and leave as he 

pleases, and when he pleases"--will, doubtless, soon be over. It 

is now beginning to be felt that health is far too serious a 

matter, not only from the individual but also from the social 

point of view, to be left to private caprice. There is, indeed, a 

tendency, in some quarters, to fear that some day society may 

rush to the opposite extreme, and bow before medicine with the 

same unreasoning deference that it once bowed before theology. 

That danger is still very remote, nor is it likely, indeed, that 

medicine will ever claim any authority of this kind. The spirit 

of medicine has, notoriously, been rather towards the assertion 

of scepticism than of dogma, and the fanatics in this field will 

always be in a hopelessly small minority. 

 

The general introduction of authentic personal records covering all 

essential data--hereditary, anthropometric and pathological--cannot fail 

to be a force on the side of positive as well as of negative eugenics, for 

it would tend to promote the procreation of the fit as well as restrict 

that of the unfit, without any legislative compulsion. With the growth of 

education a regard for such records as a preliminary to marriage would 

become as much a matter of course as once was the regard to the 

restrictions imposed by Canon law, and as still is a regard to money or to 

caste. A woman can usually refrain from marrying a man with no money and 

no prospects; a man may be passionately in love with a woman of lower 

class than himself but he seldom marries her. It needs but a clear general 

perception of all that is involved in heredity and health to make eugenic 

considerations equally influential. 


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