Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

is the reality of marriage, and not its mere legal forms, that it 

is necessary to act upon. 

 

The voluntary method is the only sound way of approach in this matter. 

Duclaux considered that the candidate for marriage should possess a 

certificate of health in much the same way as the candidate for life 

assurance, the question of professional secrecy, as well as that of 

compulsion, no more coming into one question than into the other. There is 

no reason why such certificates, of an entirely voluntary character, 

should not become customary among those persons who are sufficiently 

enlightened to realize all the grave personal, family, and social issues 

involved in marriage. The system of eugenic certification, as originated 

and developed by Galton, will constitute a valuable instrument for raising 

the moral consciousness in this matter. Galton's eugenic certificates 

would deal mainly with the natural virtues of superior hereditary 

breed--"the public recognition of a natural nobility"--but they would 

include the question of personal health and personal aptitude.[457] 

 

To demand compulsory certificates of health at marriage is indeed to begin 

at the wrong end. It would not only lead to evasions and antagonisms but 

would probably call forth a reaction. It is first necessary to create an 

enthusiasm for health, a moral conscience in matters of procreation, 

together with, on the scientific side, a general habit of registering the 

anthropological, psychological, and pathological data concerning the 

individual, from birth onwards, altogether apart from marriage. The 

earlier demands of Diday and Bertillon were thus not only on a sounder but 

also a more practicable basis. If such records were kept from birth for 

every child, there would be no need for special examination at marriage, 

and many incidental ends would be gained. There is difficulty at present 

in obtaining such records from the moment of birth, and, so far as I am 

aware, no attempts have yet been made to establish their systematic 

registration. But it is quite possible to begin at the beginning of school 

life, and this is now done at many schools and colleges in England, 

America, and elsewhere, more especially as regards anthropological, 

physiological, and psychological data, each child being submitted to a 

thorough and searching anthropometric examination, and thus furnished with 

a systematic statement of his physical condition.[458] This examination 

needs to be standardized and generalized, and repeated at fixed intervals. 

"Every individual child," as is truly stated by Dr. Dukes, the Physician 

to Rugby School, "on his entrance to a public school should be as 

carefully and as thoroughly examined as if it were for life insurance." If 

this procedure were general from an early age, there would be no hardship 

in the production of the record at marriage, and no opportunity for fraud. 

The _dossier_ of each person might well be registered by the State, as 

wills already are, and, as in the case of wills, become freely open to 

students when a century had elapsed. Until this has been done during 

several centuries our knowledge of eugenics will remain rudimentary. 

 

There can be little doubt that the eugenic attitude towards 

marriage, and the responsibility of the individual for the future 

of the race, is becoming more recognized. It is constantly 

happening that persons, about to marry, approach the physician in 

a state of serious anxiety on this point. Urquhart, indeed 

(_Journal of Mental Science_, April, 1907, p. 277), believes that 

marriages are seldom broken off on this ground; this seems, 

however, too pessimistic a view, and even when the marriage is 


Page 2 from 5:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   Forward