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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

to love other children than their own, there would be nothing to 

hinder scientific propagation in the midst of homes far better 

than any that now exist." 

 

This memorable pamphlet contains no exposition of the precise 

measures adopted by the Oneida Community to carry out these 

principles. The two essential points were, as we know, "male 

continence" (see _ante_ p. 553), and the enlarged family, in 

which all the men were the actual or potential mates of all the 

women, but no union for propagation took place, except as the 

result of reason and deliberate resolve. "The community," says 

H.J. Seymour, one of the original members (_The Oneida 

Community_, 1894, p. 5), "was a _family_, as distinctly separated 

from surrounding society as ordinary households. The tie that 

bound it together was as permanent, and at least as sacred, as 

that of marriage. Every man's care, and the whole of the common 

property, was pledged for the maintenance and protection of the 

women, and the support and education of the children." It is not 

probable that the Oneida Community presented in detail the model 

to which human society generally will conform. But even at the 

lowest estimate, its success showed, as Lord Morely has pointed 

out (_Diderot_, vol. ii, p. 19), "how modifiable are some of 

these facts of existing human character which are vulgarly deemed 

to be ultimate and ineradicable," and that "the discipline of the 

appetites and affections of sex," on which the future of 

civilization largely rests, is very far from an impossibility. 

 

In many respects, the Oneida Community was ahead of its 

time,--and even of ours,--but it is interesting to note that, in 

the matter of the control of conception, our marriage system has 

come into line with the theory and practice of Oneida; it cannot, 

indeed, be said that we always control conception in accordance 

with eugenic principles, but the fact that such control has now 

become a generally accepted habit of civilization, to some extent 

deprives Noyes' criticism of our marriage system of the force it 

possessed half a century ago. Another change in our customs--the 

advocacy, and even the practice, of abortion and 

castration--would not have met with his approval; he was strongly 

opposed to both, and with the high moral level that ruled his 

community, neither was necessary to the maintenance of the 

stirpiculture that prevailed. 

 

The Oneida Community endured for the space of one generation, and 

came to an end in 1879, by no means through a recognition of 

failure, but by a wise deference to external pressure. Its 

members, many of them highly educated, continued to cherish the 

memory of the practices and ideals of the Community. Noyes Miller 

(the author of _The Strike of a Sex_, and _Zugassant's 

Discovery_) to the last, looked with quiet confidence to the time 

when, as he anticipated, the great discovery of Noyes would be 

accepted and adopted by the world at large. Another member of the 

Community (Henry J. Seymour) wrote of the Community long 

afterwards that "It was an anticipation and imperfect miniature 

of the Kingdom of Heaven on earth." 

 

Perhaps the commonest type of proposal or attempt to improve the 

biological level of the race is by the exclusion of certain classes of 

degenerates from marriage, or by the encouragement of better classes of 

the community to marry. This seems to be, at present, the most popular 

form of eugenics, and in so far as it is not effected by compulsion but is 


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