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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

Noyes proposed to term the work of modern science in propagation 

"Stirpiculture," in which he has sometimes been followed by 

others. He considered that it is the business of the 

stirpiculturist to keep in view both quantity and quality of 

stocks, and he held that, without diminishing quantity, it was 

possible to raise the quality by exercising a very stringent 

discrimination in selecting males. At this point, Noyes has been 

supported in recent years by Karl Pearson and others, who have 

shown that only a relatively small portion of a population is 

needed to produce the next generation, and that, in fact, twelve 

per cent. of one generation in man produces fifty per cent. of 

the next generation. What we need to ensure is that this small 

reproducing section of the population shall be the best adapted 

for the purpose. "The _quantity_ of production will be in direct 

proportion to the number of fertile females," as Noyes saw the 

question, "and the _value_ produced, so far as it depends on 

selection, will be nearly in inverse proportion to the number of 

fertilizing males." In this matter, Noyes anticipated Ehrenfels. 

The two principles to be held in mind were, "Breed from the 

best," and "Breed in-and-in," with a cautious and occasional 

introduction of new strains. (It may be noted that Reibmayr, in 

his recent _Entwicklungsgeschichte des Genics und Talentes_, 

argues that the superior races, and superior individuals, in the 

human species, have been produced by an unconscious adherence to 

exactly these principles.) "By segregating superior families, and 

by breeding these in-and-in, superior varieties of human beings 

might be produced, which would be comparable to the thoroughbreds 

in all the domestic races." He illustrates this by the early 

history of the Jews. 

 

Noyes finally criticises the present method, or lack of method, 

in matters of propagation. Our marriage system, he states, 

"leaves mating to be determined by a general scramble." By 

ignoring, also, the great difference between the sexes in 

reproductive power, it "restricts each man, whatever may be his 

potency and his value, to the amount of production of which one 

woman, chosen blindly, may be capable." Moreover, he continues, 

"practically it discriminates against the best, and in favor of 

the worst; for, while the good man will be limited by his 

conscience to what the law allows, the bad man, free from moral 

check, will distribute his seed beyond the legal limits, as 

widely as he dares." "We are safe every way in saying that there 

is no possibility of carrying the two precepts of scientific 

propagation into an institution which pretends to no 

discrimination, allows no suppression, gives no more liberty to 

the best than to the worst, and which, in fact, must inevitably 

discriminate the wrong way, so long as the inferior classes are 

most prolific and least amenable to the admonitions of science 

and morality." In modifying our sexual institutions, Noyes 

insists there are two essential points to remember: the 

preservation of liberty, and the preservation of the home. There 

must be no compulsion about human scientific propagation; it must 

be autonomous, directed by self-government, "by the free choice 

of those who love science well enough to 'make themselves eunuchs 

for the Kingdom of Heaven's sake.'" The home, also, must be 

preserved, since "marriage is the best thing for man as he is;" 

but it is necessary to enlarge the home, for, "if all could learn 


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