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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

procreative powers of the less healthy and efficient stocks in a 

community, are methods of eugenics. It must not, however, be supposed that 

they are the whole of eugenics, or indeed that they are in any way 

essential to a eugenic scheme. Eugenics is concerned with the whole of the 

agencies which elevate and improve the human breed; abortion and 

castration are methods which may be used to this end, but they are not 

methods of which everyone approves, nor is it always clear that the ends 

they effect would not better be attained by other methods; in any case 

they are methods of negative eugenics. There remains the field of positive 

eugenics, which is concerned, not with the elimination of the inferior 

stocks but with ascertaining which are the superior stocks and with 

furthering their procreative power. 

 

While the necessity of refraining from procreation is no longer a bar to 

marriage, the question of whether two persons ought to marry each other 

still remains in the majority of cases a serious question from the 

standpoint of positive as well as of negative eugenics, for the normal 

marriage cannot fail to involve children, as, indeed, its chief and most 

desirable end. We have to consider not merely what are the stocks or the 

individuals that are unfit to breed, but also what are these stocks or 

individuals that are most fit to breed, and under what conditions 

procreation may best be effected. The present imperfection of our 

knowledge on these questions emphasizes the need for care and caution in 

approaching their consideration. 

 

 

 

It may be fitting, at this point, to refer to the experiment of 

the Oneida Community in establishing a system of scientific 

propagation, under the guidance of a man whose ability and 

distinction as a pioneer are only to-day beginning to be 

adequately recognized. John Humphrey Noyes was too far ahead of 

his own day to be recognized at his true worth; at the most, he 

was regarded as the sagacious and successful founder of a sect, 

and his attempts to apply eugenics to life only aroused ridicule 

and persecution, so that he was, unfortunately, compelled by 

outside pressure to bring a most instructive experiment to a 

premature end. His aim and principle are set forth in an _Essay 

on Scientific Propagation_, printed some forty years ago, which 

discusses problems that are only now beginning to attract the 

attention of the practical man, as within the range of social 

politics. When Noyes turned his vigorous and practical mind to 

the question of eugenics, that question was exclusively in the 

hands of scientific men, who felt all the natural timidity of the 

scientific man towards the realization of his proposals, and who 

were not prepared to depart a hair's breadth from the 

conventional customs of their time. The experiment of Noyes, at 

Oneida, marked a new stage in the history of eugenics; whatever 

might be the value of the experiment--and a first experiment 

cannot well be final--with Noyes the questions of eugenics passed 

beyond the purely academic stage in which, from the time of 

Plato, they had peacefully reposed. "It is becoming clear," Noyes 

states at the outset, "that the foundations of scientific society 

are to be laid in the scientific propagation of human beings." In 

doing this, we must attend to two things: blood (or heredity) and 

training; and he puts blood first. In that, he was at one with 

the most recent biometrical eugenists of to-day ("the nation has 

for years been putting its money on 'Environment,' when 

'Heredity' wins in a canter," as Karl Pearson prefers to put it), 


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