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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

infiltrative anaesthesia, and was not so extremely painful, though 

what pain there was (dragging the cord out through the slit, 

etc.) seemed very hard to endure. I was not out of my office a 

single day, nor seriously disturbed in any way. In six days all 

stitches in the scrotum were removed, and in three weeks I 

abandoned the suspensory bandage that had been rendered necessary 

by the extreme sensitiveness of the testicles and cord. 

 

"The operation has proved a most complete success in every way. 

Sexual functions are _absolutely unaffected in any way 

whatsoever_. There is no sense of discomfort or uneasiness in the 

sexual tract, and what seems strangest of all to me, is the fact 

that the semen, so far as one can judge by ordinary means of 

observation, is undiminished in quantity and unchanged in 

character. (Of course, the microscope would reveal its fatal 

lack.) 

 

"My wife is delighted at having fear banished from our love, and, 

taken all in all, it certainly seems as if life would mean more 

to us both. Incidentally, the health of both of us seems better 

than usual, particularly so in my wife's case, and this she 

attributes to a soothing influence that is attained by allowing 

the seminal fluid to be deposited in a perfectly normal manner, 

and remain in contact with the vaginal secretions until it 

naturally passes off. 

 

"This operation being comparatively new, and, as yet, not often 

done on others than the insane, criminal, etc., I thought it 

might be of interest to you. If I shed even the faintest ray of 

light on this greatest of all human problems ... I shall be glad 

indeed." 

 

Such a case, with its so far satisfactory issue, certainly 

deserves to be placed on record, though it may well be that at 

present it will not be widely imitated. 

 

The earliest advocacy of castration, which I have met with as a part of 

negative eugenics, for the specific "purpose of prophylaxis as applied to 

race improvement and the protection of society," is by Dr. F.E. Daniel, of 

Texas, and dates from 1893.[447] Daniel mixed up, however, somewhat 

inextricably, castration as a method of purifying the race, a method which 

can be carried out with the concurrence of the individual operated on, 

with castration as a punishment, to be inflicted for rape, sodomy, 

bestiality, pederasty and even habitual masturbation, the method of its 

performance, moreover, to be the extremely barbarous and primitive method 

of total ablation of the sexual organs. In more recent years somewhat more 

equitable, practical, and scientific methods of castration have been 

advocated, not involving the removal of the sexual glands or organs, and 

not as a punishment, but simply for the sake of protecting the community 

and the race from the burden of probably unproductive and possibly 

dangerous members. Naecke has, from 1899 onwards, repeatedly urged the 

social advantages of this measure.[448] The propagation of the inferior 

elements of society, Naecke insists, brings unhappiness into the family and 

is a source of great expense to the State. He regards castration as the 

only effective method of prevention, and concludes that it is, therefore, 

our duty to adopt it, just as we have adopted vaccination, taking care to 

secure the consent of the subject himself or his guardian, of the civil 

authorities, and, if necessary, of a committee of experts. Professor 

Angelo Zuccarelli of Naples has also, from 1899 onwards, emphasized the 

importance of castration in the sterilization of the epileptic, the insane 


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