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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

The other two methods only effect a single act of union or its results, 

but castration affects all subsequent acts of sexual union and usually 

destroys the procreative power permanently. 

 

Castration for various social and other purposes is an ancient and 

widespread practice, carried out on men and on animals. There has, 

however, been on the whole a certain prejudice against it when applied to 

men. Many peoples have attached a very sacred value to the integrity of 

the sexual organs. Among some primitive peoples the removal of these 

organs has been regarded as a peculiarly ferocious insult, only to be 

carried out in moments of great excitement, as after a battle. Medicine 

has been opposed to any interference with the sexual organs. The oath 

taken by the Greek physicians appears to prohibit castration: "I will not 

cut."[446] In modern times a great change has taken place, the castration 

of both men and women is commonly performed in diseased conditions; the 

same operation is sometimes advocated and occasionally performed in the 

hope that it may remove strong and abnormal sexual impulses. And during 

recent years castration has been invoked in the cause of negative 

eugenics, to a greater extent, indeed, on account of its more radical 

character, than either the prevention of conception or abortion. 

 

The movement in favor of castration appears to have begun in the United 

States, where various experiments have been made in embodying it in law. 

It was first advocated merely as a punishment for criminals, and 

especially sexual offenders, by Hammond, Everts, Lydston and others. From 

this point of view, however, it seems to be unsatisfactory and perhaps 

illegitimate. In many cases castration is no punishment at all, and indeed 

a positive benefit. In other cases, when inflicted against the subject's 

will, it may produce very disturbing mental effects, leading in already 

degenerate or unbalanced persons to insanity, criminality, and anti-social 

tendencies generally, much more dangerous than the original state. 

Eugenic considerations, which were later brought forward, constitute a 

much sounder argument for castration; in this case the castration is 

carried out, by no means in order to inflict a barbarous and degrading 

punishment, but, with the subject's consent, in order to protect the 

community from the risk of useless or mischievous members. 

 

The fact that castration can no longer be properly considered a 

punishment, is shown by the possibility of deliberately seeking 

the operation simply for the sake of convenience, as a preferable 

and most effective substitute for the adoption of preventive 

methods in sexual intercourse. I am only at present acquainted 

with one case in which this course has been adopted. This subject 

is a medical man (of Puritan New England ancestry) with whose 

sexual history, which is quite normal, I have been acquainted for 

a long time past. His present age is thirty-nine. A few years 

since, having a sufficiently large family, he adopted preventive 

methods of intercourse. The subsequent events I narrate in his 

own words: "The trouble, forethought, etc., rendered necessary by 

preventive measures, grew more and more irksome to me as the 

years passed by, and finally, I laid the matter before another 

physician, and on his assurances, and after mature deliberation 

with my wife, was operated on some time since, and rendered 

sterile by having the vas deferens on each side exposed through a 

slit in the scrotum, then tied in two places with silk and 

severed between the ligatures. This was done under cocaine 


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