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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

The medical profession, which took the first step in modern times in the 

authorization of abortion, has not at present taken any further step. It 

has been content to lay down the principle that when the interests of the 

mother are opposed to those of the foetus, it is the latter which must be 

sacrificed. It has hesitated to take the further step of placing abortion 

on the eugenic basis, and of claiming the right to insist on abortion 

whenever the medical and hygienic interests of society demand such a step. 

This attitude is perfectly intelligible. Medicine has in the past been 

chiefly identified with the saving of lives, even of worthless and worse 

than worthless lives; "Keep everything alive! Keep everything alive!" 

nervously cried Sir James Paget. Medicine has confined itself to the 

humble task of attempting to cure evils, and is only to-day beginning to 

undertake the larger and nobler task of preventing them. 

 

 

 

"The step from killing the child in the womb to murdering a 

person when out of the womb, is a dangerously narrow one," sagely 

remarks a recent medical author, probably speaking for many 

others, who somehow succeed in blinding themselves to the fact 

that this "dangerously narrow step" has been taken by mankind, 

only too freely, for thousands of years past, long before 

abortion was known in the world. 

 

Here and there, however, medical authors of repute have advocated 

the further extension of abortion, with precautions, and under 

proper supervision, as an aid to eugenic progress. Thus, 

Professor Max Flesch (_Die Neue Generation_, April, 1909) is in 

favor of a change in the law permitting abortion (provided it is 

carried out by the physician) in special cases, as when the 

mother's pregnancy has been due to force, when she has been 

abandoned, or when, in the interests of the community, it is 

desirable to prevent the propagation of insane, criminal, 

alcoholic, or tuberculous persons. 

 

In France, a medical man, Dr. Jean Darricarrere, has written a 

remarkable novel, _Le Droit d'Avortement_ (1906), which advocates 

the thesis that a woman always possesses a complete right to 

abortion, and is the supreme judge as to whether she will or not 

undergo the pain and risks of childbirth. The question is, here, 

however, obviously placed not on medical, but on humanitarian and 

feminist grounds. 

 


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