Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Neue Generation_, June, 1908), endeavors to make clear all that 

is involved in the effort to protect the developing embryo 

against the organism that carries it, to protect a creature, that 

is, against itself and its own instincts. She considers that most 

of the women who terminate their pregnancies artificially would 

only have produced undesirables, for the normal, healthy, robust 

woman has no desire to effect abortion. "There are women who are 

psychically sterile, without being physically so, and who possess 

nothing of motherhood but the ability to bring forth. These, when 

they abort, are simply correcting a failure of Nature." Some of 

them, she remarks, by going on to term, become guilty of the far 

worse offence of infanticide. As for the women who desire 

abortion merely from motives of vanity, or convenience, Oda 

Olberg points out that the circles in which these motives rule 

are quite able to limit their children without having to resort 

to abortion. She concludes that society must protect the young 

life in every way, by social hygiene, by laws for the protection 

of the workers, by spreading a new morality on the basis of the 

laws of heredity. But we need no law to protect the young 

creature against its own mother, for a thousand natural forces 

are urging the mother to protect her own child, and we may be 

sure that she will not disobey these forces without very good 

reasons. Camilla Jellinek, again (_Die Strafrechtsreform_, etc., 

Heidelberg, 1909), in a powerful and well-informed address before 

the Associated German Frauenvereine, at Breslau, argues in the 

same sense. 

 

The lawyers very speedily came to the assistance of the women in 

this matter, the more readily, no doubt, since the traditions of 

the greatest and most influential body of law already pointed, on 

one side at all events, in the same direction. It may, indeed, be 

claimed that it was from the side of law--and in Italy, the 

classic land of legal reform--that this new movement first begun. 

In 1888, Balestrini published, at Turin, his _Aborto, 

Infanticidio ed Esposizione d'Infante_, in which he argued that 

the penalty should be removed from abortion. It was a very able 

and learned book, inspired by large ideas and a humanitarian 

spirit, but though its importance is now recognized, it cannot be 

said that it attracted much attention on publication. 

 

It is especially in Germany that, during recent years, lawyers 

have followed women reformers, by advocating, more or less 

completely, the abolition of the punishment for abortion. So 

distinguished an authority as Von Liszt, in a private letter to 

Camilla Jellinek (op. cit.), states that he regards the 

punishment of abortion as "very doubtful," though he considers 

its complete abolition impracticable; he thinks abortion might be 

permitted during the early months of pregnancy, thus bringing 

about a return of the old view. Hans Gross states his opinion 

(_Archiv fuer Kriminal-Anthropologie_, Bd. XII, p. 345) that the 

time is not far distant when abortion will no longer be punished. 

Radbruch and Von Lilienthal speak in the same sense. Weinberg has 

advocated a change in the law (_Mutterschutz_, 1905, Heft 8), 

and Kurt Hiller (_Die Neue Generation_, April, 1909), also from 

the legal side, argues that abortion should only be punishable 

when effected by a married woman, without the knowledge and 

consent of her husband. 


Page 4 from 5:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   Forward