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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

barbarity of the laws, and the penalty of death for abortion was finally 

abolished.[440] 

 

Medical science and practice at the present day--although it can scarcely 

be said that it speaks with an absolutely unanimous voice--on the whole 

occupies a position midway between that of the classic lawyers and that of 

the later Christian ecclesiastics. It is, on the whole, in favor of 

sacrificing the foetus whenever the interests of the mother demand such a 

sacrifice. General medical opinion is not, however, prepared at present to 

go further, and is distinctly disinclined to aid the parents in exerting 

an unqualified control over the foetus in the womb, nor is it yet disposed 

to practice abortion on eugenic grounds. It is obvious, indeed, that 

medicine cannot in this matter take the initiative, for it is the primary 

duty of medicine to save life. Society itself must assume the 

responsibility of protecting the race. 

 

Dr. S. Macvie ("Mother _versus_ Child," _Transactions Edinburgh 

Obstetrical Society_, vol. xxiv, 1899) elaborately discusses the 

respective values of the foetus and the adult on the basis of 

life-expectancy, and concludes that the foetus is merely 

"a parasite performing no function whatever," and that "unless 

the life-expectancy of the child covers the years in which its 

potentiality is converted into actuality, the relative values of 

the maternal and foetal life will be that of actual as against 

potential." This statement seems fairly sound. Ballantyne 

(_Manual of Antenatal Pathology: The Foetus_, p. 459) 

endeavors to make the statement more precise by saying that "the 

mother's life has a value, because she is what she is, while the 

foetus only has a possible value, on account of what it may 

become." 

 

Durlacher, among others, has discussed, in careful and cautious 

detail, the various conditions in which the physician should, or 

should not, induce abortion in the interests of the mother ("Der 

Kuenstliche Abort," _Wiener Klinik_, Aug. and Sept., 1906); so 

also, Eugen Wilhelm ("Die Abtreibung und das Recht des Arztes zur 

Vernichtung der Leibesfrucht," _Sexual-Probleme_, May and June, 

1909). Wilhelm further discusses whether it is desirable to alter 

the laws in order to give the physician greater freedom in 

deciding on abortion. He concludes that this is not necessary, 

and might even act injuriously, by unduly hampering medical 

freedom. Any change in the law should merely be, he considers, in 

the direction of asserting that the destruction of the foetus is 

not abortion in the legal sense, provided it is indicated by the 

rules of medical science. With reference to the timidity of some 

medical men in inducing abortion, Wilhelm remarks that, even in 

the present state of the law, the physician who conscientiously 

effects abortion, in accordance with his best knowledge, even if 

mistakenly, may consider himself safe from all legal penalties, 

and that he is much more likely to come in conflict with the law 

if it can be proved that death followed as a result of his 

neglect to induce abortion. 

 

Pinard, who has discussed the right to control the foetal 

life (_Annales de Gynecologie_, vols. lii and liii, 1899 and 

1900), inspired by his enthusiastic propaganda for the salvation 

of infant life, is led to the unwarranted conclusion that no one 

has the rights of life and death over the foetus; "the infant's 

right to his life is an imprescriptible and sacred right, which 


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