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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

procuring abortion has to-day reached "such vast proportions as 

to be almost beyond belief," while "countless thousands" of cases 

are never reported. "It has increased so rapidly in our day and 

generation," Scott states, "that it has created surprise and 

alarm in the minds of all conscientious persons who are informed 

of the extent to which it is carried." (The assumption that those 

who approve of abortion are necessarily not "conscientious 

persons" is, as we shall see, mistaken.) The change has taken 

place since 1840. The Michigan Special Committee on Criminal 

Abortion reported in 1881 that, from correspondence with nearly 

one hundred physicians, it appeared that there came to the 

knowledge of the profession seventeen abortions to every one 

hundred pregnancies; to these, the committee believe, may be 

added as many more that never came to the physician's knowledge. 

The committee further quoted, though without endorsement, the 

opinion of a physician who believed that a change is now coming 

over public feeling in regard to the abortionist, who is 

beginning to be regarded in America as a useful member of 

society, and even a benefactor. 

 

 

In England, also, there appears to have been a marked increase of 

abortion during recent years, perhaps specially marked among the 

poor and hard-working classes. A writer in the _British Medical 

Journal_ (April 9, 1904, p. 865) finds that abortion is 

"wholesale and systematic," and gives four cases occurring in his 

practice during four months, in which women either attempted to 

produce abortion, or requested him to do so; they were married 

women, usually with large families, and in delicate health, and 

were willing to endure any suffering, if they might be saved from 

further child-bearing. Abortion is frequently effected, or 

attempted, by taking "Female Pills," which contain small portions 

of lead, and are thus liable to produce very serious symptoms, 

whether or not they induce abortion. Professor Arthur Hall, of 

Sheffield, who has especially studied this use of lead ("The 

Increasing Use of Lead as an Abortifacient," _British Medical 

Journal_, March 18, 1905), finds that the practice has lately 

become very common in the English Midlands, and is gradually, it 

appears, widening its circle. It occurs chiefly among married 

women with families, belonging to the working class, and it tends 

to become specially prevalent during periods of trade depression 

(cf. G. Newman, _Infant Mortality_, p. 81). Women of better 

social class resort to professional abortionists, and sometimes 

go over to Paris. 


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