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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

of the penis; Fallopius recommended the use of such an appliance. 

Improvements in the manufacture were gradually devised; the caecum 

of the lamb was employed, and afterwards, isinglass. It appears 

that a considerable improvement in the manufacture took place in 

the seventeenth or eighteenth century, and this improvement was 

generally associated with England. The appliance thus became 

known as the English cape or mantle, the "capote anglaise," or 

the "redingote anglaise," and, under the latter name, is referred 

to by Casanova, in the middle of the eighteenth century 

(Casanova, _Memoires_, ed. Garnier, vol. iv, p. 464); Casanova 

never seems, however, to have used these redingotes himself, not 

caring, he said, "to shut myself up in a piece of dead skin in 

order to prove that I am perfectly alive." These capotes--then 

made of goldbeaters' skin--were, also, it appears, known at an 

earlier period to Mme. de Sevigne, who did not regard them with 

favor, for, in one of her letters, she refers to them as 

"cuirasses contre la volupte et toiles d'arraignee contre le 

mal." The name, "condom," dates from the eighteenth century, 

first appearing in France, and is generally considered to be that 

of an English physician, or surgeon, who invented, or, rather, 

improved the appliance. Condom is not, however, an English name, 

but there is an English name, Condon, of which "condom" may well 

be a corruption. This supposition is strengthened by the fact 

that the word sometimes actually was written "condon." Thus, in 

lines quoted by Bachaumont, in his _Diary_ (Dec. 15, 1773), and 

supposed to be addressed to a former ballet dancer who had become 

a prostitute, I find:-- 

 

"Du _condon_ cependant, vous connaissez l'usage, 

* * * * * 

"Le _condon_, c'est la loi, ma fille, et les prophetes!" 

 

The difficulty remains, however, of discovering any Englishman of 

the name of Condon, who can plausibly be associated with the 

condom; doubtless he took no care to put the matter on record, 

never suspecting the fame that would accrue to his invention, or 

the immortality that awaited his name. I find no mention of any 

Condon in the records of the College of Physicians, and at the 

College of Surgeons, also, where, indeed, the old lists are very 

imperfect, Mr. Victor Plarr, the librarian, after kindly making a 

search, has assured me that there is no record of the name. Other 

varying explanations of the name have been offered, with more or 

less assurance, though usually without any proofs. Thus, Hyrtl 

(_Handbuch der Topographischen Anatomic_, 7th ed., vol. ii, p. 

212) states that the condom was originally called gondom, from 

the name of the English discoverer, a Cavalier of Charles II's 

Court, who first prepared it from the amnion of the sheep; Gondom 

is, however, no more an English name than Condom. There happens 

to be a French town, in Gascony, called Condom, and Bloch 

suggests, without any evidence, that this furnished the name; if 

so, however, it is improbable that it would have been unknown in 

France. Finally, Hans Ferdy considers that it is derived from 

"condus"--that which preserves--and, in accordance with his 

theory, he terms the condom a condus. 

 

The early history of the condom is briefly discussed by various 

writers, as by Proksch, _Die Vorbauung der Venerischen 

Krankheiten_, p. 48; Bloch, _Sexual Life of Our Time_, Chs. XV 


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