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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

some cases of heart disease, however, it is possible that, though 

there is no reason for prohibiting marriage, it is desirable for 

a woman not to have any children (J.F. Blacker, "Heart Disease in 

Relation to Pregnancy," _British Medical Journal_, May 25, 1907). 

 

In all such cases, the recommendation of preventive methods of 

intercourse is obviously an indispensable aid to the physician in 

emphasizing the supremacy of hygienic precautions. In the absence 

of such methods, he can never be sure that his warnings will be 

heard, and even the observance of his advice would be attended 

with various undesirable results. It sometimes happens that a 

married couple agree, even before marriage, to live together 

without sexual relations, but, for various reasons, it is seldom 

found possible or convenient to maintain this resolution for a 

long period. 

 

It is the recognition of these and similar considerations which has 

led--though only within recent years--on the one hand, as we have seen, to 

the embodiment of the control of procreation into the practical morality 

of all civilized nations, and, on the other hand, to the assertion, now 

perhaps without exception, by all medical authorities on matters of sex 

that the use of the methods of preventing conception is under certain 

circumstances urgently necessary and quite harmless.[432] It arouses a 

smile to-day when we find that less than a century ago it was possible for 

an able and esteemed medical author to declare that the use of "various 

abominable means" to prevent conception is "based upon a most presumptuous 

doubt in the conservative power of the Creator."[433] 

 

The adaptation of theory to practice is not yet complete, and we could not 

expect that it should be so, for, as we have seen, there is always an 

antagonism between practical morality and traditional morality. From time 

to time flagrant illustrations of this antagonism occur.[434] Even in 

England, which played a pioneering part in the control of procreation, 

attempts are still made--sometimes in quarters where we have a right to 

expect a better knowledge--to cast discredit on a movement which, since 

it has conquered alike scientific approval and popular practice, it is now 

idle to call in question. 

 

 

It would be out of place to discuss here the various methods which are 

used for the control of procreation, or their respective merits and 

defects. It is sufficient to say that the condom or protective sheath, 

which seems to be the most ancient of all methods of preventing 

conception, after withdrawal, is now regarded by nearly all authorities 

as, when properly used, the safest, the most convenient, and the most 

harmless method.[435] This is the opinion of Krafft-Ebing, of Moll, of 

Schrenck-Notzing, of Loewenfeld, of Forel, of Kisch, of Fuerbringer, to 

mention only a few of the most distinguished medical authorities.[436] 

 

There is some interest in attempting to trace the origin and 

history of the condom, though it seems impossible to do so with 

any precision. It is probable that, in a rudimentary form, such 

an appliance is of great antiquity. In China and Japan, it would 

appear, rounds of oiled silk paper are used to cover the mouth of 

the womb, at all events, by prostitutes. This seems the simplest 

and most obvious mechanical method of preventing conception, and 

may have suggested the application of a sheath to the penis as a 

more effectual method. In Europe, it is in the middle of the 

sixteenth century, in Italy, that we first seem to hear of such 

appliances, in the shape of linen sheaths, adapted to the shape 


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