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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

In 1877, Dr. C.R. Drysdale founded the Malthusian League, and 

edited a periodical, _The Malthusian_, aided throughout by his 

wife, Dr. Alice Drysdale Vickery. He died in 1907. (The noble and 

pioneering work of the Drysdales has not yet been adequately 

recognized in their own country; an appreciative and 

well-informed article by Dr. Hermann Rohleder, "Dr. C.R. 

Drysdale, Der Hauptvortreter der Neumalthusianische Lehre," 

appeared in the _Zeitschrift fuer Sexualwissenschaft_, March, 

1908). There are now societies and periodicals in all civilized 

countries for the propagation of Neo-Malthusian principles, as 

they are still commonly called, though it would be desirable to 

avoid the use of Malthus's name in this connection. In the 

medical profession, the advocacy of preventive methods of sexual 

intercourse, not on social, but on medical and hygienic grounds, 

began same thirty years ago, though in France, at an earlier 

date, Raciborski advocated the method of avoiding the 

neighborhood of menstruation. In Germany, Dr. Mensinga, the 

gynaecologist, is the most prominent advocate, on medical and 

hygienic grounds, of what he terms "facultative sterility," which 

he first put forward about 1889. In Russia, about the same time, 

artificial sterility was first openly advocated by the 

distinguished gynaecologist, Professor Ott, at the St. Petersburg 

Obstetric and Gynaecological Society. Such medical 

recommendations, in particular cases, are now becoming common. 

 

 

There are certain cases in which a person ought not to marry at 

all; this is so, for instance, when there has been an attack of 

insanity; it can never be said with certainty that a person who 

has had one attack of insanity will not have another, and persons 

who have had such attacks ought not, as Blandford says (Lumleian 

Lectures on Insanity, _British Medical Journal_, April 20, 1895), 

"to inflict on their partner for life, the anxiety, and even 

danger, of another attack." There are other and numerous cases in 

which marriage may be permitted, or may have already taken place, 

under more favorable circumstances, but where it is, or has 

become, highly desirable that there should be no children. This 

is the case when a first attack of insanity occurs after 

marriage, the more urgently if the affected party is the wife, 

and especially if the disease takes the form of puerperal mania. 

"What can be more lamentable," asks Blandford (loc. cit.), "than 

to see a woman break down in childbed, recover, break down again 

with the next child, and so on, for six, seven, or eight 

children, the recovery between each being less and less, until 

she is almost a chronic maniac?" It has been found, moreover, by 

Tredgold (_Lancet_, May 17, 1902), that among children born to 

insane mothers, the mortality is twice as great as the ordinary 

infantile mortality, in even the poorest districts. In cases of 

unions between persons with tuberculous antecedents, also, it is 

held by many (e.g., by Massalongo, in discussing tuberculosis and 

marriage at the Tuberculosis Congress, at Naples, in 1900) that 

every precaution should be taken to make the marriage childless. 

In a third class of cases, it is necessary to limit the children 

to one or two; this happens in some forms of heart disease, in 

which pregnancy has a progressively deteriorating effect on the 

heart (Kisch, _Therapeutische Monatsheft_, Feb., 1898, and 

_Sexual Life of Woman_; Vinay, _Lyon Medical_, Jan. 8, 1889); in 


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