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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

asked, he should be silent (Bouvier, _Dissertatio in sextum 

Decalogi praeceptum; supplementum ad Tractatum de Matrimonio_. 

1849, pp. 179-182; quoted by Hans Ferdy, _Sexual-Probleme_, Aug., 

1908, p. 498). We see, therefore, that, among Catholic as well as 

among non-Catholic populations, the adoption of preventive 

methods of conception follows progress and civilization, and 

that the general practice of such methods by Catholics (with the 

tacit consent of the Church) is merely a matter of time. 

 

From time to time many energetic persons have noisily demanded that a stop 

should be put to the decline of the birthrate, for, they argue, it means 

"race suicide." It is now beginning to be realized, however, that this 

outcry was a foolish and mischievous mistake. It is impossible to walk 

through the streets of any great city, full of vast numbers of persons 

who, obviously, ought never to have been born, without recognizing that 

the birthrate is as yet very far above its normal and healthy limit. The 

greatest States have often been the smallest so far as mere number of 

citizens is concerned, for it is quality not quantity that counts. And 

while it is true that the increase of the best types of citizens can only 

enrich a State, it is now becoming intolerable that a nation should 

increase by the mere dumping down of procreative refuse in its midst. It 

is beginning to be realized that this process not only depreciates the 

quality of a people but imposes on a State an inordinate financial burden. 

 

It is now well recognized that large families are associated with 

degeneracy, and, in the widest sense, with abnormality of every 

kind. Thus, it is undoubtedly true that men of genius tend to 

belong to very large families, though it may be pointed out to 

those who fear an alarming decrease of genius from the tendency 

to the limitation of the family, that the position in the family 

most often occupied by the child of genius is the firstborn. (See 

Havelock Ellis, _A Study of British Genius_, pp. 115-120). The 

insane, the idiotic, imbecile, and weak-minded, the criminal, the 

epileptic, the hysterical, the neurasthenic, the tubercular, all, 

it would appear, tend to belong to large families (see e.g., 

Havelock Ellis, op. cit., p. 110; Toulouse, _Les Causes de la 

Folie_, p. 91; Harriet Alexander, "Malthusianism and Degeneracy," 

_Alienist and Neurologist_, Jan., 1901). It has, indeed, been 

shown by Heron, Pearson, and Goring, that not only the 

eldest-born, but also the second-born, are specially liable to 

suffer from pathological defect (insanity, criminality, 

tuberculosis). There is, however, it would seem, a fallacy in the 

common interpretation of this fact. According to Van den Velden 

(as quoted in _Sexual-Probleme_, May, 1909, p. 381), this 

tendency is fully counterbalanced by the rising mortality of 

children from the firstborn onward. The greater pathological 

tendency of the earlier children is thus simply the result of a 

less stringent selection by death. So far as they show any really 

greater pathological tendency, apart from this fallacy, it is 

perhaps due to premature marriage. There is another fallacy in 

the frequent statement that the children in small families are 

more feeble than those in large families. We have to distinguish 

between a naturally small family, and an artificially small 

family. A family which is small merely as the result of the 

feeble procreative energy of the parents, is likely to be a 

feeble family; a family which is small as the result of the 


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