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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

to some trivial industrial product." It would be impracticable, 

and even undesirable, to insist that married women should not be 

allowed to work, for a work in the world is good for all. It is 

estimated that over thirty per cent. of the women workers in 

England are married or widows (James Haslam, _Englishwoman_, 

June, 1909), and in Lancashire factories alone, in 1901, there 

were 120,000 married women employed. But it would be easily 

possible for the State to arrange, in its own interests, that a 

woman's work at a trade should always give way to her work as a 

mother. It is the more undesirable that married women should be 

prohibited from working at a profession, since there are some 

professions for which a married woman, or, rather, a mother, is 

better equipped than an unmarried woman. This is notably the case 

as regards teaching, and it would be a good policy to allow 

married women teachers special privileges in the shape of 

increased free time and leave of absence. While in many fields of 

knowledge an unmarried woman may be a most excellent teacher, it 

is highly undesirable that children, and especially girls, should 

be brought exclusively under the educational influence of 

unmarried teachers. 

 

The second great channel through which the impulse towards the control of 

procreation for the elevation of the race is entering into practical life 

is by the general adoption, by the educated classes of all countries--and 

it must be remembered that, in this matter at all events, all classes are 

gradually beginning to become educated--of methods for the prevention of 

conception except when conception is deliberately desired. It is no longer 

permissible to discuss the validity of this control, for it is an 

accomplished fact and has become a part of our modern morality. "If a 

course of conduct is habitually and deliberately pursued by vast 

multitudes of otherwise well-conducted people, forming probably a majority 

of the whole educated class of the nation," as Sidney Webb rightly puts 

it, "we must assume that it does not conflict with their actual code of 

morality."[428] 

 

 

There cannot be any doubt that, so far as England is concerned, 

the prevention of conception is practiced, from prudential or 

other motives, by the vast majority of the educated classes. This 

fact is well within the knowledge of all who are intimately 

acquainted with the facts of English family life. Thus, Dr. A.W. 

Thomas writes (_British Medical Journal_, Oct. 20, 1906, p. 

1066): "From my experience as a general practitioner, I have no 

hesitation in saying that ninety per cent. of young married 

couples of the comfortably-off classes use preventives." As a 

matter of fact, this rough estimate appears to be rather under 

than over the mark. In the very able paper already quoted, in 

which Sidney Webb shows that "the decline in the birthrate 

appears to be much greater in those sections of the population 

which give proofs of thrift and foresight," that this decline is 

"principally, if not entirely, the result of deliberate 

volition," and that "a volitional regulation of the marriage 

state is now ubiquitous throughout England and Wales, among, 

apparently, a large majority of the population," the results are 

brought forward of a detailed inquiry carried out by the Fabian 

Society. This inquiry covered 316 families, selected at random 

from all parts of Great Britain, and belonging to all sections of 

the middle class. The results are carefully analyzed, and it is 


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