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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

right than the individual to ravish a woman against her will. We are 

beginning to realize that if the State wants children it must make it 

agreeable to women to produce them, as under natural and equitable 

conditions it cannot fail to be. "The women will solve the question of 

mankind," said Ibsen in one of his rare and pregnant private utterances, 

"and they will do it as mothers." But it is unthinkable that any question 

should ever be solved by a helpless, unwilling, and involuntary act which 

has not even attained to the dignity of animal joy. 

 

It is sometimes supposed, and even assumed, that the demand of 

women that motherhood must never be compulsory, means that they 

are unwilling to be mothers on any terms. In a few cases that may 

be so, but it is certainly not the case as regards the majority 

of sane and healthy women in any country. On the contrary, this 

demand is usually associated with the desire to glorify 

motherhood, if not, indeed, even with the thought of extending 

motherhood to many who are to-day shut out from it. "It seems to 

me," wrote Lady Henry Somerset, some years ago ("The Welcome 

Child," _Arena_, April, 1895), "that life will be dearer and 

nobler the more we recognize that there is no indelicacy in the 

climax and crown of creative power, but, rather, that it is the 

highest glory of the race. But if voluntary motherhood is the 

crown of the race, involuntary compulsory motherhood is the very 

opposite.... Only when both man and woman have learned that the 

most sacred of all functions given to women must be exercised by 

the free will alone, can children be born into the world who have 

in them the joyous desire to live, who claim that sweetest 

privilege of childhood, the certainty that they can expand in the 

sunshine of the love which is their due." Ellen Key, similarly, 

while pointing out (_Ueber Liebe und Ehe_, pp. 14, 265) that the 

tyranny of the old Protestant religious spirit which enjoined on 

women unlimited submission to joyless motherhood within "the 

whited sepulchre of marriage" is now being broken, exalts the 

privileges of voluntary motherhood, while admitting that there 

may be a few exceptional cases in which women may withdraw 

themselves from motherhood for the sake of the other demands of 

their personality, though, "as a general rule, the woman who 

refuses motherhood in order to serve humanity, is like a soldier 

who prepares himself on the eve of battle for the forthcoming 

struggle by opening his veins." Helene Stoecker, likewise, reckons 

motherhood as one of the demands, one of the growing demands 

indeed, which women now make. "If, to-day," she says (in the 

Preface to _Liebe und die Frauen_, 1906), "all the good things of 

life are claimed even for women--intellectual training, pecuniary 

independence, a happy vocation in life, a respected social 

position--and at the same time, as equally matter-of-course, and 

equally necessary, marriage and child, that demand no longer 

sounds, as it sounded a few years ago, the voice of a preacher in 

the wilderness." 

 

The degradation to which motherhood has, in the eyes of many, 

fallen, is due partly to the tendency to deprive women of any 

voice in the question, and partly to what H.G. Wells calls 

(_Socialism and the Family_, 1906) "the monstrous absurdity of 

women discharging their supreme social function, bearing and 

rearing children, in their spare time, as it were, while they 

'earn their living' by contributing some half mechanical element 


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