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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

rightly added, is a necessary preliminary to any legislation in 

this direction. 

 

Of recent years, many books and articles have been devoted to the 

advocacy of eugenic methods. Mention may be made, for instance, 

of _Population and Progress_ (1907), by Montague Crackanthorpe, 

President of the Eugenics Education Society. See also, Havelock 

Ellis, "Eugenics and St. Valentine," _Nineteenth Century and 

After_, May, 1906. It may be mentioned that nearly thirty years 

ago, Miss J.H. Clapperton, in her _Scientific Meliorism_ (1885, 

Ch. XVII), pointed out that the voluntary restraint of 

procreation by Neo-Malthusian methods, apart from merely 

prudential motives, there clearly recognized, is "a new key to 

the social position," and a necessary condition for "national 

regeneration." Professor Karl Pearson's _Groundwork of Eugenics_, 

(1909) is, perhaps, the best brief introduction to the subject. 

Mention may also be made of Dr. Saleeby's _Parenthood and Race 

Culture_ (1909), written in a popular and enthusiastic manner. 

 

How widely the general principles of eugenics are now accepted as 

the sound method of raising the level of the human race, was well 

shown at a meeting of the Sociological Society, in 1905, when, 

after Sir Francis Galton had read papers on the question, the 

meeting heard the opinions of numerous sociologists, economists, 

biologists, and well-known thinkers in various lands, who were 

present, or who had sent communications. Some twenty-one 

expressed more or less unqualified approval, and only three or 

four had objections to offer, mostly on matters of detail 

(_Sociological Papers_, published by the Sociological Society, 

vol. ii, 1905). 

 

If we ask by what channels this impulse towards the control of procreation 

for the elevation of the race is expressing itself in practical life, we 

shall scarcely fail to find that there are at least two such channels: (1) 

the growing sense of sexual responsibility among women as well as men, and 

(2) the conquest of procreative control which has been achieved in recent 

years, by the general adoption of methods for the prevention of 

conception. 

 

It has already been necessary in a previous chapter to discuss the 

far-reaching significance of woman's personal responsibility as an element 

in the modification of the sexual life of modern communities. Here it need 

only be pointed out that the autonomous authority of a woman over her own 

person, in the sexual sphere, involves on her part a consent to the act of 

procreation which must be deliberate. We are apt to think that this is a 

new and almost revolutionary demand; it is, however, undoubtedly a 

natural, ancient, and recognized privilege of women that they should not 

be mothers without their own consent. Even in the Islamic world of the 

_Arabian Nights_, we find that high praise is accorded to the "virtue and 

courage" of the woman who, having been ravished in her sleep, exposed, and 

abandoned on the highway, the infant that was the fruit of this 

involuntary union, "not wishing," she said, "to take the responsibility 

before Allah of a child that had been born without my consent."[427] The 

approval with which this story is narrated clearly shows that to the 

public of Islam it seemed entirely just and humane that a woman should not 

have a child, except by her own deliberate will. We have been accustomed 

to say in later days that the State needs children, and that it is the 

business and the duty of women to supply them. But the State has no more 


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