Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

In the last chapter of his _Memories of My Life_ (1908), on "Race 

Improvement," Sir Francis Galton sets forth the origin and 

development of his conception of the science of eugenics. The 

term, "eugenics," he first used in 1884, in his _Human Faculty_, 

but the conception dates from 1865, and even earlier. Galton has 

more recently discussed the problems of eugenics in papers read 

before the Sociological Society (_Sociological Papers_, vols. i 

and ii, 1905), in the Herbert Spencer Lecture on "Probability the 

Foundation of Eugenics," (1907), and elsewhere. Galton's numerous 

memoirs on this subject have now been published in a collected 

form by the Eugenics Education Society, which was established in 

1907, to further and to popularize the eugenical attitude towards 

social questions; _The Eugenics Review_ is published by this 

Society. On the more strictly scientific side, eugenic studies 

are carried on in the Eugenics Laboratory of the University of 

London, established by Sir Francis Galton, and now working in 

connection with Professor Karl Pearson's biometric laboratory, in 

University College. Much of Professor Pearson's statistical work 

in this and allied directions, is the elaboration of ideas and 

suggestions thrown out by Galton. See, e.g., Karl Pearson's 

Robert Boyle Lecture, "The Scope and Importance to the State of 

the Science of National Eugenics" (1907). _Biometrika_, edited by 

Karl Pearson in association with other workers, contains numerous 

statistical memoirs on eugenics. In Germany, the _Archiv fuer 

Rassen und Gesellschafts-biologie_, and the 

_Politisch-Anthropologische Revue_, are largely occupied with 

various aspects of such subjects, and in America, _The Popular 

Science Monthly_ from time to time, publishes articles which have 

a bearing on eugenics. 

 

 

At one time there was a tendency to scoff, or to laugh, at the eugenic 

movement. It was regarded as an attempt to breed men as men breed animals, 

and it was thought a sufficiently easy task to sweep away this new 

movement with the remark that love laughs at bolts and bars. It is now 

beginning to be better understood. None but fanatics dream of abolishing 

love in order to effect pairing by rule. It is merely a question of 

limiting the possible number of mates from whom each may select a partner, 

and that, we must remember, has always been done even by savages, for, as 

it has been said, "eugenics is the oldest of the sciences." The question 

has merely been transformed. Instead of being limited mechanically by 

caste, we begin to see that the choice of sexual mates must be limited 

intelligently by actual fitness. Promiscuous marriages have never been the 

rule; the possibility of choice has always been narrow, and the most 

primitive peoples have exerted the most marked self-restraint. It is not 

so merely among remote races but among our own European ancestors. 

Throughout the whole period of Catholic supremacy the Canon law 

multiplied the impediments to matrimony, as by ordaining that 

consanguinity to the fourth degree (third cousins), as well as spiritual 

relationship, is an impediment, and by such arbitrary prohibitions limited 

the range of possible mates at least as much as it would be limited by the 

more reasonable dictates of eugenic considerations. 

 

At the present day it may be said that the principle of the voluntary 

control of procreation, not for the selfish ends of the individual, but in 

order to extinguish disease, to limit human misery, and to raise the 

general level of humanity by substituting the ideal of quality for the 


Page 1 from 6: [1]  2   3   4   5   6   Forward