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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

form of the union, but on the value of the children created. Men 

and women will then devote the same religious earnestness to the 

psychic and physical perfectioning of this sexual task as 

Christians have devoted to the salvation of their souls." 

 

Sir Francis Galton, writing a few years later, but without doubt 

independently, in 1905, on "Restrictions in Marriage," and 

"Eugenics as a Factor in Religion" (_Sociological Papers_ of the 

Sociological Society, vol. ii, pp. 13, 53), remarks: "Religious 

precepts, founded on the ethics and practice of older days, 

require to be reinterpreted, to make them conform to the needs of 

progressive nations. Ours are already so far behind modern 

requirements that much of our practice and our profession cannot 

be reconciled without illegitimate casuistry. It seems to me 

that few things are more needed by us in England than a revision 

of our religion, to adapt it to the intelligence and needs of 

this present time.... Evolution is a grand phantasmagoria, but it 

assumes an infinitely more interesting aspect under the knowledge 

that the intelligent action of the human will is, in some small 

measure, capable of guiding its course. Man has the power of 

doing this largely, so far as the evolution of humanity is 

concerned; he has already affected the quality and distribution 

of organic life so widely that the changes on the surface of the 

earth, merely through his disforestings and agriculture, would be 

recognizable from a distance as great as that of the moon. 

Eugenics is a virile creed, full of hopefulness, and appealing to 

many of the noblest feelings of our nature." 

 

As will always happen in every great movement, a few fanatics 

have carried into absurdity the belief in the supreme religious 

importance of procreation. Love, apart from procreation, writes 

one of these fanatics, Vacher de Lapouge, in the spirit of some 

of the early Christian Fathers (see _ante_ p. 509), is an 

aberration comparable to sadism and sodomy. Procreation is the 

only thing that matters, and it must become "a legally prescribed 

social duty" only to be exercised by carefully selected persons, 

and forbidden to others, who must, by necessity, be deprived of 

the power of procreation, while abortion and infanticide must, 

under some circumstances, become compulsory. Romantic love will 

disappear by a process of selection, as also will all religion 

except a new form of phallic worship (G. Vacher de Lapouge, "Die 

Crisis der Sexuellen Moral," _Politisch Anthropologische Revue_, 

No. 8, 1908). It is sufficient to point out that love is, and 

always must be, the natural portal to generation. Such excesses 

of procreative fanaticism cannot fail to occur, and they render 

the more necessary the emphasis which has here been placed on the 

art of love. 

 

"What has posterity done for me that I should do anything for posterity?" 

a cynic is said to have asked. The answer is very simple. The human race 

has done everything for him. All that he is, and can be, is its creation; 

all that he can do is the result of its laboriously accumulated 

traditions. It is only by working towards the creation of a still better 

posterity, that he can repay the good gifts which the human race has 

brought him.[426] Just as, within the limits of this present life, many 

who have received benefits and kindnesses they can never repay to the 

actual givers, find a pleasure in vicariously repaying the like to 


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