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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

remarks. If that is the way procreation is to be carried on, it would be 

better to create and mould every human being afresh out of the earth; in 

that way we could at all events eliminate evil heredity. It was, however, 

unjust to place the responsibility on God. It is men and women who breed 

the people that make the world good or bad. They seek to put the evils of 

society on to something outside themselves. They see how large a 

proportion of human beings are defective, ill-conditioned, anti-social, 

incapable of leading a whole and beautiful human life. In old theological 

language it was often said that such were "children of the Devil," and 

Luther himself was often ready enough to attribute the evil of the world 

to the direct interposition of the Devil. Yet these ill-conditioned people 

who clog the wheels of society are, after all, in reality the children of 

Man. The only Devil whom we can justly invoke in this matter is Man. 

 

The command "Be fruitful and multiply," which the ancient Hebrews put into 

the mouth of their tribal God, was, as Crackanthorpe points out,[424] a 

command supposed to have been uttered when there were only eight persons 

in the world. If the time should ever again occur when the inhabitants of 

the world could be counted on one's fingers, such an injunction, as 

Crackanthorpe truly observes, would again be reasonable. But we have to 

remember that to-day humanity has spawned itself over the world in 

hundreds and even thousands of millions of creatures, a large proportion 

of whom, as is but too obvious, ought never to have been born at all, and 

the voice of Jehovah is now making itself heard through the leaders of 

mankind in a very different sense. 

 

It is not surprising that as this fact tends to become generally 

recognized, the question of the procreation of the race should gain a new 

significance, and even tend to take on the character of a new religious 

movement. Mere morality can never lead us to concern ourselves with the 

future of the race, and in the days of old, men used to protest against 

the tendency to subordinate the interests of religion to the claims of 

"mere morality." There was a sound natural instinct underlying that 

protest, so often and so vigorously made by Christianity, and again 

revived to-day in a more intelligent form. The claim of the race is the 

claim of religion. We have to beware lest we subordinate that claim to our 

moralities. Moralities are, indeed, an inevitable part of our social order 

from which we cannot escape; every community must have its _mores_. But we 

are not entitled to make a fetich of our morality, sacrificing to it the 

highest interests entrusted to us. The nations which have done so have 

already signed their own death-warrant.[425] From this point of view, the 

whole of Christianity, rightly considered, with its profound conviction of 

the necessity for forethought and preparation for the life hereafter, has 

been a preparation for eugenics, a schoolmaster to discipline within us a 

higher ideal than itself taught, and we cannot therefore be surprised at 

the solidity of the basis on which eugenical conceptions of life are 

developing. 

 

The most distinguished pioneers of the new movement of devotion 

to the creation of the race seem independently to have realized 

its religious character. This attitude is equally marked in Ellen 

Key and Francis Galton. In her _Century of the Child_ (English 

translation, 1909), Ellen Key entirely identifies herself with 

the eugenic movement. "It is only a question of time," she 

elsewhere writes (_Ueber Liebe und Ehe_, p. 445), "when the 

attitude of society towards a sexual union will depend not on the 


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