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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

belief with false science and mere superstition. The belief 

itself is supported by some of the most cautious and experienced 

modern gynaecologists. Thus, Matthews Duncan (in his lectures on 

_Sterility in Women_) argued that the absence of sexual desire in 

women, and the absence of pleasure in the sexual act, are 

powerful influences making for sterility. He brought forward a 

table based on his case-books, showing that of nearly four 

hundred sterile women, only about one-fourth experienced sexual 

desire, while less than half experienced pleasure in the sexual 

act. In the absence, however, of a corresponding table concerning 

fertile women, nothing is hereby absolutely proved, and, at most, 

only a probability established. 

 

Kisch, more recently (in his _Sexual Life of Woman_), has dealt 

fully with this question, and reaches the conclusion that it is 

"extremely probable" that the active erotic participation of the 

woman in coitus is an important link in the chain of conditions 

producing conception. It acts, he remarks, in either or both of 

two ways, by causing reflex changes in the cervical secretions, 

and so facilitating the passage of the spermatozoa, and by 

causing reflex erectile changes in the cervix itself, with slight 

descent of the uterus, so rendering the entrance of the semen 

easier. Kisch refers to the analogous fact that the first 

occurrence of menstruation is favored by sexual excitement. 

 

Some authorities go so far as to assert that, until voluptuous 

excitement occurs in women, no impregnation is possible. This 

statement seems too extreme. It is true that the occurrence of 

impregnation during sleep, or in anaesthesia, cannot be opposed to 

it, for we know that the unconsciousness of these states by no 

means prevents the occurrence of complete sexual excitement. We 

cannot fail, however, to connect the fact that impregnation 

frequently fails to occur for months and even years after 

marriage, with the fact that sexual pleasure in coitus on the 

wife's part also frequently fails to occur for a similar period. 

 

"Of all human instincts," Pinard has said,[422] "that of reproduction is 

the only one which remains in the primitive condition and has received no 

education. We procreate to-day as they procreated in the Stone Age. The 

most important act in the life of man, the sublimest of all acts since it 

is that of his reproduction, man accomplishes to-day with as much 

carelessness as in the age of the cave-man." And though Pinard himself, as 

the founder of puericulture, has greatly contributed to call attention to 

the vast destinies that hang on the act of procreation, there still 

remains a lamentable amount of truth in this statement. "Future 

generations," writes Westermarck in his great history of moral ideas,[423] 

"will probably with a kind of horror look back at a period when the most 

important, and in its consequences the most far-reaching, function which 

has fallen to the lot of man was entirely left to individual caprice and 

lust." 

 

We are told in his _Table Talk_, that the great Luther was accustomed to 

say that God's way of making man was very foolish ("sehr naerrisch"), and 

that if God had deigned to take him into His counsel he would have 

strongly advised Him to make the whole human race, as He made Adam, "out 

of earth." And certainly if applied to the careless and reckless manner in 

which procreation in Luther's day, as still for the most part in our own, 

was usually carried out there was sound common sense in the Reformer's 


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