Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

CHAPTER XII. 

 

THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION. 

 

The Relationship of the Science of Procreation to the Art of Love--Sexual 

Desire and Sexual Pleasure as the Conditions of Conception--Reproduction 

Formerly Left to Caprice and Lust--The Question of Procreation as a 

Religious Question--The Creed of Eugenics--Ellen Key and Sir Francis 

Galton--Our Debt to Posterity--The Problem of Replacing Natural 

Selection--The Origin and Development of Eugenics--The General Acceptance 

of Eugenical Principles To-day--The Two Channels by Which Eugenical 

Principles are Becoming Embodied in Practice--The Sense of Sexual 

Responsibility in Women--The Rejection of Compulsory Motherhood--The 

Privilege of Voluntary Motherhood--Causes of the Degradation of 

Motherhood--The Control of Conception--Now Practiced by the Majority of 

the Population in Civilized Countries--The Fallacy of "Racial 

Suicide"--Are Large Families a Stigma of Degeneration?--Procreative 

Control the Outcome of Natural and Civilized Progress--The Growth of 

Neo-Malthusian Beliefs and Practices--Facultative Sterility as Distinct 

from Neo-Malthusianism--The Medical and Hygienic Necessity of Control of 

Conception--Preventive Methods--Abortion--The New Doctrine of the Duty to 

Practice Abortion--How Far is this Justifiable?--Castration as a Method of 

Controlling Procreation--Negative Eugenics and Positive Eugenics--The 

Question of Certificates for Marriage--The Inadequacy of Eugenics by Act 

of Parliament--The Quickening of the Social Conscience in Regard to 

Heredity--Limitations to the Endowment of Motherhood--The Conditions 

Favorable to Procreation--Sterility--The Question of Artificial 

Fecundation--The Best Age of Procreation--The Question of Early 

Motherhood--The Best Time for Procreation--The Completion of the Divine 

Cycle of Life. 

 

 

We have seen that the art of love has an independent and amply justifiable 

right to existence apart, altogether, from procreation. Even if we still 

believed--as all men must once have believed and some Central Australians 

yet believe[421]--that sexual intercourse has no essential connection with 

the propagation of the race it would have full right to existence. In its 

finer manifestations as an art it is required in civilization for the full 

development of the individual, and it is equally required for that 

stability of relationships which is nearly everywhere regarded as a demand 

of social morality. 

 

When we now turn to the second great constitutional factor of marriage, 

procreation, the first point we encounter is that the art of love here 

also has its place. In ancient times the sexual congruence of any man with 

any woman was supposed to be so much a matter of course that all questions 

of love and of the art of love could be left out of consideration. The 

propagative act might, it was thought, be performed as impersonally, as 

perfunctorily, as the early Christian Fathers imagined it had been 

performed in Paradise. That view is no longer acceptable. It fails to 

commend itself to men, and still less to women. We know that in 

civilization at all events--and it is often indeed the same among 

savages--erethism is not always easy between two persons selected at 

random, nor even when they are more specially selected. And we also know, 

on the authority of very distinguished gynaecologists, that it is not in 

very many cases sufficient even to effect coitus, it is also necessary to 

excite orgasm, if conception is to be achieved. 

 

Many primitive peoples, as well as the theologians of the Middle 

Ages, have believed that sexual excitement on the woman's part is 

necessary to conception, though they have sometimes mixed up that 


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