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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

customs. Thus Rasmussen (_People of the Polar North_, p. 65) says in 

reference to the Eskimo custom of wife-exchange: "A man once told me that 

he only beat his wife when she would not receive other men. She would have 

nothing to do with anyone but him--and that was her only failing!" 

Rasmussen elsewhere shows that the Eskimo are capable of extreme jealousy. 

 

[414] See, e.g., Moll, _Sexualleben des Kindes_, p. 158; cf., Gesell's 

"Study of Jealousy." 

 

[415] Jealousy is notoriously common among drunkards. As K. Birnbaum 

points out ("Das Sexualleben der Alkokolisten," _Sexual-Probleme_, Jan., 

1909), this jealousy is, in most cases, more or less well-founded, for the 

wife, disgusted with her husband, naturally seeks sympathy and 

companionship elsewhere. Alcoholic jealousy, however, goes far beyond its 

basis of support in fact, and is entangled with delusions and 

hallucinations. (See e.g., G. Dumas, "La Logique d'un Dement," _Revue 

Philosophique_, Feb., 1908; also Stefanowski, "Morbid Jealousy," _Alienist 

and Neurologist_, July, 1893.) 

 

[416] Ellen Key, _Ueber Liebe und Ehe_, p. 335. 

 

[417] Schrempf points out ("Von Stella zu Klaerchen," _Mutterschutz_, 1906, 

Heft 7, p. 264) that Goethe strove to show in _Egmont_ that a woman is 

repelled by the love of a man who knows nothing beyond his love to her, 

and that it is easy for her to devote herself to the man whose aims lie in 

the larger world beyond herself. There is profound truth in this view. 

 

[418] A discussion on "Platonic friendship" of this kind by several 

writers, mostly women, whose opinions were nearly equally divided, may be 

found, for instance, in the _Lady's Realm_, March, 1900. 

 

[419] There are no doubt important exceptions. Thus Merimee's famous 

friendship with Mlle. Jenny Dacquin, enshrined in the _Lettres a une 

Inconnue_, was perhaps Platonic throughout on Merimee's side, Mlle. 

Dacquin adapting herself to his attitude. Cf. A. Lefebvre, _La Celebre 

Inconnue de Merimee_, 1908. 

 

[420] The love-letters of all these distinguished persons have been 

published. Rosa Mayreder (_Zur Kritik der Weiblichkeit_, pp. 229 _et 

seq._) discusses the question of the humble and absolute manner in which 

even men of the most masculine and impetuous genius abandon themselves to 

the inspiration of the beloved woman. The case of the Brownings, who have 

been termed "the hero and heroine of the most wonderful love-story that 

the world knows of," is specially notable; (Ellen Key has written of the 

Brownings from this point of view in _Menschen_, and reference may be made 

to an article on the Brownings' love-letters in the _Edinburgh Review_, 

April, 1899). It is scarcely necessary to add that an erotic relationship 

may mean very much to persons of high intellectual ability, even when its 

issue is not happy; of Mary Wollstonecraft, one of the most intellectually 

distinguished of women, it may be said that the letters which enshrine her 

love to the worthless Imlay are among the most passionate and pathetic 

love-letters in English. 

 


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