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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

proved by the fact that it is now considered by many that the very term 

"conjugal rights" arose merely by a mistake for "conjugal rites." Before 

1733, when legal proceedings were in Latin, the term used was _obsequies_, 

and "rights," instead of "rites," seems to have been merely a typesetter's 

error (see _Notes and Queries_, May 16, 1891; May 6, 1899). This 

explanation, it should be added, only applies to the consecrated term, for 

there can be no doubt that the underlying idea has an existence quite 

independent of the term. 

 

[401] "In most marriages that are not happy," it is said in Rafford Pyke's 

thoughtful paper on "Husbands and Wives" (_Cosmopolitan_, 1902), "it is 

the wife rather than the husband who is oftenest disappointed." 

 

[402] See "Analysis of the Sexual Impulse," in vol. iii of these 

_Studies_. 

 

[403] It is well recognized by erotic writers, however, that women may 

sometimes take a comparatively active part. Thus Vatsyayana says that 

sometimes the woman may take the man's position, and with flowers in her 

hair and smiles mixed with sighs and bent head, caressing him and pressing 

her breasts against him, say: "You have been my conqueror; it is my turn 

to make you cry for mercy." 

 

[404] Thus among the Swahili it is on the third day after marriage that 

the bridegroom is allowed, by custom, to complete defloration, according 

to Zache, _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1899, II-III, p. 84. 

 

[405] _De l'Amour_, vol. ii, p. 57. 

 

[406] Robert Michels, "Brautstandsmoral," _Geschlecht und Gesellschaft_, 

Jahrgang I, Heft 12. 

 

[407] I may refer once more to the facts brought together in volume iii of 

these _Studies_, "The Analysis of the Sexual Impulse." 

 

[408] This has been pointed out, for instance, by Rutgers, "Sexuelle 

Differenzierung," _Die Neue Generation_, Dec., 1908. 

 

[409] Thus, among the Eskimo, who practice temporary wife-exchange, 

Rasmussen states that "a man generally discovers that his own wife is, in 

spite of all, the best." 

 

[410] "I have always held with the late Professor Laycock," remarks 

Clouston (_Hygiene of Mind_, p. 214), "who was a very subtle student of 

human nature, that a married couple need not be always together to be 

happy, and that in fact reasonable absences and partings tend towards 

ultimate and closer union." That the prolongation of passion is only 

compatible with absence scarcely needs pointing out; as Mary 

Wollstonecraft long since said (_Rights of Woman_, original ed., p. 61), 

it is only in absence or in misfortune that passion is durable. It may be 

added, however, that in her love-letters to Imlay she wrote: "I have ever 

declared that two people who mean to live together ought not to be long 

separated." 

 

[411] "Viewed broadly," says Arnold L. Gesell, in his interesting study of 

"Jealousy" (_American Journal of Psychology_, Oct., 1906), "jealousy seems 

such a necessary psychological accompaniment to biological behavior, 

amidst competitive struggle, that one is tempted to consider it 

genetically among the oldest of the emotions, synonymous almost with the 

will to live, and to make it scarcely less fundamental than fear or anger. 

In fact, jealousy readily passes into anger, and is itself a brand of 

fear.... In sociability and mutual aid we see the other side of the 

shield; but jealousy, however anti-social it may be, retains a function in 

zooelogical economy: viz., to conserve the individual as against the group. 

It is Nature's great corrective for the purely social emotions." 

 

[412] Many illustrations are brought together in Gesell's study of 

"Jealousy." 

 

[413] Jealousy among lower races may be disguised or modified by tribal 


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