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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[375] _Quaestionum Convivalium_, lib. iii, quaestio 6. 

 

[376] E.D. Cope, "The Marriage Problem," _Open Court_, Nov. 1888. 

 

[377] Columbus meeting of the American Medical Association, 1900. 

 

[378] Ellen Key, _Ueber Liebe und Ehe_, p. 24. 

 

[379] In an admirable article on Friedrich Schlegel's _Lucinde_ 

(_Mutterschutz_, 1906, Heft 5), Heinrich Meyer-Benfey, in pointing out 

that the Catholic sacramental conception of marriage licensed love, but 

failed to elevate it, regards _Lucinde_, with all its defects, as the 

first expression of the unity of the senses and the soul, and, as such, 

the basis of the new ethics of love. It must, however, be said that four 

hundred years earlier Pontano had expressed this same erotic unity far 

more robustly and wholesomely than Schlegel, though the Latin verse in 

which he wrote, fresh and vital as it is, remained without influence. 

Pontano's _Carmina_, including the "De Amore Conjugali," have at length 

been reprinted in a scholarly edition by Soldati. 

 

[380] From the thirteenth to the seventeenth centuries Ovid was, in 

reality, the most popular and influential classic poet. His works played a 

large part in moulding Renaissance literature, not least in England, where 

Marlowe translated his _Amores_, and Shakespeare, during the early years 

of his literary activity, was greatly indebted to him (see, e.g., Sidney 

Lee, "Ovid and Shakespeare's Sonnets," _Quarterly Review_, Ap., 1909). 

 

[381] This has already been discussed in Chapter II. 

 

[382] By the age of twenty-five, as G. Hirth remarks (_Wege zur Heimat_, 

p. 541), an energetic and sexually disposed man in a large city has, for 

the most part, already had relations with some twenty-five women, perhaps 

even as many as fifty, while a well-bred and cultivated woman at that age 

is still only beginning to realize the slowly summating excitations of 

sex. 

 

[383] In his study of "Conjugal Aversion" (_Journal Nervous and Mental 

Disease_, Sept., 1892) Smith Baker points out the value of adequate sexual 

knowledge before marriage in lessening the risks of such aversion. 

 

[384] "It may be said to the honor of men," Adler truly remarks (op. cit., 

p. 182), "that it is perhaps not often their conscious brutality that is 

at fault in this matter, but merely lack of skill and lack of 

understanding. The husband who is not specially endowed by nature and 

experience for psychic intercourse with women, is not likely, through his 

earlier intercourse with Venus vulgivaga, to bring into marriage any 

useful knowledge, psychic or physical." 

 

[385] "The first night," writes a correspondent concerning his marriage, 

"she found the act very painful and was frightened and surprised at the 

size of my penis, and at my suddenly getting on her. We had talked very 

openly about sex things before marriage, and it never occurred to me that 

she was ignorant of the details of the act. I imagined it would disgust 

her to talk about these things; but I now see I should have explained 

things to her. Before marrying I had come to the conclusion that the 

respect owed to one's wife was incompatible with any talk that might seem 

indecent, and also I had made a resolve not to subject her to what I 

thought then were dirty tricks, even to be naked and to have her naked. In 

fact, I was the victim of mock modesty; it was an artificial reaction from 

the life I had been living before marriage. Now it seems to me to be 

natural, if you love a woman, to do whatever occurs to you and to her. If 

I had not felt it wrong to encourage such acts between us, there might 

have been established a sexual sympathy which would have bound me more 

closely to her." 


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