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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

some interesting remarks on this point: "Society," he says, "has 

been far more, and more intelligently, preoccupied with the 

problem of answering the 'question of breed' than the 'question 

of love.' The first problem fills all our civil and commercial 

codes. The second problem has never been clearly stated, or 

looked in the face, not even in antiquity, still less since the 

coming of Christianity, for merely to offer the solutions of 

marriage and prostitution is manifestly inadequate. Statesmen 

have only seen the side on which it touches population. Hence 

the marriage laws. Sterile love they profess to disdain. Yet it 

is evident that, though born as the serf of generation, love 

tends by civilization to be freed from it. In place of a simple 

method of procreation it has become an end, it has created itself 

a title, a royal title. Our gardens cultivate flowers that are 

all the more charming because they are sterile; why is the double 

corolla of love held more infamous than the sterilized flowers of 

our gardens?" Tarde replies that the reason is that our 

politicians are merely ambitious persons thirsting for power and 

wealth, and even when they are lovers they are Don Juans rather 

than Virgils. "The future," he continues, "is to the Virgilians, 

because if the ambition of power, the regal wealth of American or 

European millionarism, once seemed nobler, love now more and more 

attracts to itself the best and highest parts of the soul, where 

lies the hidden ferment of all that is greatest in science and 

art, and more and more those studious and artist souls multiply 

who, intent on their peaceful activities, hold in horror the 

business men and the politicians, and will one day succeed in 

driving them back. That assuredly will be the great and capital 

revolution of humanity, an active psychological revolution: the 

recognized preponderance of the meditative and contemplative, the 

lover's side of the human soul, over the feverish, expansive, 

rapacious, and ambitious side. And then it will be understood 

that one of the greatest of social problems, perhaps the most 

arduous of all, has been the problem of love." 


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