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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

love," another woman writes, "is a mother's tenderness. He whom 

she loves is a child of larger growth, although she may at the 

same time have a deep respect for him." (See also, for similar 

opinion of another woman of distinguished intellectual ability, 

footnote at beginning of "The Psychic State in Pregnancy" in 

volume v of these _Studies_.) 

 

It is on the basis of these elemental human facts that the 

permanently seductive and inspiring relationships of sex are 

developed, and not by the emergence of personalities who combine 

impossibly exalted characteristics. "The task is extremely 

difficult," says Kisch in his _Sexual Life of Woman_, "but a 

clever and virtuous modern wife must endeavor to combine in her 

single personality the sensuous attractiveness of an Aspasia, the 

chastity of a Lucrece, and the intellectual greatness of a 

Cornelia." And in an earlier century we are told in the novel of 

_La Tia Fingida_, which has sometimes been attributed to 

Cervantes, that "a woman should be an angel in the street, a 

saint in church, beautiful at the window, honest in the house, 

and a demon in bed." The demands made of men by women, on the 

other hand, have been almost too lofty to bear definite 

formulation at all. "Ninety-nine out of a hundred loving women," 

says Helene Stoecker, "certainly believe that if a thousand other 

men have behaved ignobly, and forsaken, ill-used, and deceived 

the woman they love, the man they love is an exception, marked 

out from all other men; that is the reason they love him." It may 

be doubted, however, if the great lovers have ever stood very far 

above the ordinary level of humanity by their possession of 

perfection. They have been human, and their art of love has not 

always excluded the possession of human frailties; perfection, 

indeed, even if it could be found, would furnish a bad soil for 

love to strike deep roots in. 

 

It is only when we realize the highly complex nature of the elements which 

make up erotic love that we can understand how it is that that love can 

constitute so tremendous a revelation and exert so profound an influence 

even in men of the greatest genius and intellect and in the sphere of 

their most spiritual activity. It is not merely passion, nor any conscious 

skill in the erotic art,--important as these may be,--that would serve to 

account for Goethe's relationship to Frau von Stein, or Wagner's to 

Mathilde Wesendonck, or that of Robert and Elizabeth Browning to each 

other.[420] 

 

It may now be clear to the reader why it has been necessary in a 

discussion of the sexual impulse in its relationship to society to deal 

with the art of love. It is true that there is nothing so intimately 

private and personal as the erotic affairs of the individual. Yet it is 

equally true that these affairs lie at the basis of the social life, and 

furnish the conditions--good or bad as the case may be--of that 

procreative act which is a supreme concern of the State. It is because the 

question of love is of such purely private interest that it tends to be 

submerged in the question of breed. We have to realize, not only that the 

question of love subserves the question of breed, but also that love has a 

proper, a necessary, even a socially wholesome claim, to stand by itself 

and to be regarded for its own worth. 

 

In the profoundly suggestive study of love which the 

distinguished sociologist Tarde left behind at his death 

(_Archives d'Anthropologie Criminelle_, loc. cit.), there are 


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