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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Apart altogether, however, from the question of its effectiveness, or even 

of the misery that it causes to all concerned, it is evident that jealousy 

is incompatible with all the tendencies of civilization. We have seen that 

a certain degree of variation is involved in the sexual relationship, as 

in all other relationships, and unless we are to continue to perpetuate 

many evils and injustices, that fact has to be faced and recognized. We 

have also seen that the line of our advance involves a constant increase 

in moral responsibility and self-government, and that, in its turn, 

implies not only a high degree of sincerity but also the recognition that 

no person has any right, or indeed any power, to control the emotions and 

actions of another person. If our sun of love stands still at midday, 

according to Ellen Key's phrase, that is a miracle to be greeted with awe 

and gratitude, and by no means a right to be demanded. The claim of 

jealousy falls with the claim of conjugal rights. 

 

It is quite possible, Bloch remarks (_The Sexual Life of Our 

Time_, Ch. X), to love more than one person at the same time, 

with nearly equal tenderness, and to be honestly able to assure 

each of the passion felt for her or him. Bloch adds that the vast 

psychic differentiation involved by modern civilization increases 

the possibility of this double love, for it is difficult for 

anyone to find his complement in a single person, and that this 

applies to women as well as to men. 

 

Georg Hirth likewise points out (_Wege zur Heimat_, pp. 543-552) 

that it is important to remember that women, as well as men, can 

love two persons at the same time. Men flatter themselves, he 

remarks, with the prejudice that the female heart, or rather 

brain, can only hold one man at a time, and that if there is a 

second man it is by a kind of prostitution. Nearly all erotic 

writers, poets, and novelists, even physicians and psychologists, 

belong to this class, he says; they look on a woman as property, 

and of course two men cannot "possess" a woman. (Regarding 

novelists, however, the remark may be interpolated that there are 

many exceptions, and Thomas Hardy, for instance, frequently 

represents a woman as more or less in love with two men at the 

same time.) As against this desire to depreciate women's psychic 

capacity, Hirth maintains that a woman is not necessarily obliged 

to be untrue to one man because she has conceived a passion for 

another man. "Today," Hirth truly declares, "only love and 

justice can count as honorable motives in marriage. The modern 

man accords to the beloved wife and life-companion the same 

freedom which he himself took before marriage, and perhaps still 

takes in marriage. If she makes no use of it, as is to be 

hoped--so much the better! But let there be no lies, no 

deception; the indispensable foundation of modern marriage is 

boundless sincerity and friendship, the deepest trust, 

affectionate devotion, and consideration. This is the best 

safeguard against adultery.... Let him, however, who is, 

nevertheless, overtaken by the outbreak of it console himself 

with the undoubted fact that of two real lovers the most 

noble-minded and deep-seeing _friend_ will always have the 

preference." These wise words cannot be too deeply meditated. The 

policy of jealousy is only successful--when it is successful--in 

the hands of the man who counts the external husk of love more 

precious than the kernel. 

 

It seems to some that the recognition of variations in sexual 


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