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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

treatment, as well as the dangers suffered, by any persons whom they may 

infect. Although it has not been possible to make the system at every 

point thoroughly operative, its general success is indicated by the entire 

reliance now placed on it, and the abandonment of the police regulation of 

prostitution. A system very similar to that of Denmark was established 

some years previously in Norway. The principle of the treatment of 

venereal disease at the public expense exists also in Sweden as well as in 

Finland, where treatment is compulsory.[243] 

 

It can scarcely be said that the principle of notification has yet been 

properly applied on a large scale to venereal diseases. But it is 

constantly becoming more widely advocated, more especially in England and 

the United States,[244] where national temperament and political 

traditions render the system of the police regulation of prostitution 

impossible--even if it were more effective than it practically is--and 

where the system of dealing with venereal disease on the basis of public 

health has to be recognized as not only the best but the only possible 

system.[245] 

 

In association with this, it is necessary, as is also becoming ever more 

widely recognized, that there should be the most ample facilities for the 

gratuitous treatment of venereal diseases; the general establishment of 

free dispensaries, open in the evenings, is especially necessary, for many 

can only seek advice and help at this time. It is largely to the 

systematic introduction of facilities for gratuitous treatment that the 

enormous reduction in venereal disease in Sweden, Norway, and Bosnia is 

attributed. It is the absence of the facilities for treatment, the implied 

feeling that the victims of venereal disease are not sufferers but merely 

offenders not entitled to care, that has in the past operated so 

disastrously in artificially promoting the dissemination of preventable 

diseases which might be brought under control. 

 

If we dispense with the paternal methods of police regulation, if we rely 

on the general principles of medical hygiene, and for the rest allow the 

responsibility for his own good or bad actions to rest on the individual 

himself, there is a further step, already fully recognized in principle, 

which we cannot neglect to take: We must look on every person as 

accountable for the venereal diseases he transmits. So long as we refuse 

to recognize venereal diseases as on the same level as other infectious 

diseases, and so long as we offer no full and fair facilities for their 

treatment, it is unjust to bring the individual to account for spreading 

them. But if we publicly recognize the danger of infectious venereal 

diseases, and if we leave freedom to the individual, we must inevitably 

declare, with Duclaux, that every man or woman must be held responsible 

for the diseases he or she communicates. 

 

According to the Oldenburg Code of 1814 it was a punishable offence for a 

venereally diseased person to have sexual intercourse with a healthy 

person, whether or not infection resulted. In Germany to-day, however, 

there is no law of this kind, although eminent German legal authorities, 

notably Von Liszt, are of opinion that a paragraph should be added to the 

Code declaring that sexual intercourse on the part of a person who knows 

that he is diseased should be punishable by imprisonment for a period not 

exceeding two years, the law not to be applied as between married couples 

except on the application of one of the parties. At the present time in 

Germany the transmission of venereal disease is only punishable as a 


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