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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

of putting venereal diseases under the ordinary law and dealing with them 

as with other contagious diseases. 

 

The first step in dealing with a contagious disease is to apply to it the 

recognized principles of notification. Every new application of the 

principle, it is true, meets with opposition. It is without practical 

result, it is an unwarranted inquisition into the affairs of the 

individual, it is a new tax on the busy medical practitioner, etc. 

Certainly notification by itself will not arrest the progress of any 

infectious disease. But it is an essential element in every attempt to 

deal with the prevention of disease. Unless we know precisely the exact 

incidence, local variations, and temporary fluctuations of a disease we 

are entirely in the dark and can only beat about at random. All progress 

in public hygiene has been accompanied by the increased notification of 

disease, and most authorities are agreed that such notification must be 

still further extended, any slight inconvenience thus caused to 

individuals being of trifling importance compared to the great public 

interests at stake. It is true that so great an authority as Neisser has 

expressed doubt concerning the extension of notification to gonorrhoea; 

the diagnosis cannot be infallible, and the patients often give false 

names. These objections, however, seem trivial; diagnosis can very seldom 

be infallible (though in this field no one has done so much for exact 

diagnosis as Neisser himself), and names are not necessary for 

notification, and are not indeed required in the form of compulsory 

notification of venereal disease which existed a few years ago in Norway. 

 

The principle of the compulsory notification of venereal diseases seems to 

have been first established in Prussia, where it dates from 1835. The 

system here, however, is only partial, not being obligatory in all cases 

but only when in the doctor's opinion secrecy might be harmful to the 

patient himself or to the community; it is only obligatory when the 

patient is a soldier. This method of notification is indeed on a wrong 

basis, it is not part of a comprehensive sanitary system but merely an 

auxiliary to police methods of dealing with prostitution. According to 

the Scandinavian system, notification, though not an essential part of 

this system, rests on an entirely different basis. 

 

The Scandinavian plan in a modified form has lately been established in 

Denmark. This little country, so closely adjoining Germany, for some time 

followed in this matter the example of its great neighbor and adopted the 

police regulation of prostitution and venereal disease. The more 

fundamental Scandinavian affinities of Denmark were, however, eventually 

asserted, and in 1906, the system of regulation was entirely abandoned and 

Denmark resolved to rely on thorough and systematic application of the 

sanitary principle already accepted in the country, although something of 

German influence still persists in the strict regulation of the streets 

and the penalties imposed upon brothel-keepers, leaving prostitution 

itself free. The decisive feature of the present system is, however, that 

the sanitary authorities are now exclusively medical. Everyone, whatever 

his social or financial position, is entitled to the free treatment of 

venereal disease. Whether he avails himself of it or not, he is in any 

case bound to undergo treatment. Every diseased person is thus, so far as 

it can be achieved, in a doctor's hands. All doctors have their 

instructions in regard to such cases, they have not only to inform their 

patients that they cannot marry so long as risks of infection are 

estimated to be present, but that they are liable for the expenses of 


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