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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

no, and do keep me from going into the room where she is. Ninth 

November. Up, and I did, by a little note which I flung to Deb, 

advise her that I did continue to deny that ever I kissed her, 

and so she might govern herself. The truth is that I did 

adventure upon God's pardoning me this lie, knowing how heavy a 

thing it would be for me, to the ruin of the poor girl, and next 

knowing that if my wife should know all it would be impossible 

for her ever to be at peace with me again, and so our whole lives 

would be uncomfortable. The girl read, and as I bid her returned 

me the note, flinging it to me in passing by." Next day, however, 

he is "mightily troubled," for his wife has obtained a confession 

from the girl of the kissing. For some nights Mr. and Mrs. Pepys 

are both sleepless, with much weeping on either side. Deb gets 

another place, leaving on the 14th of November, and Pepys is 

never able to see her before she leaves the house, his wife 

keeping him always under her eye. It is evident that Pepys now 

feels strongly attracted to Deb, though there is no evidence of 

this before she became the subject of the quarrel. On the 13th of 

November, hearing she was to leave next day, he writes: "The 

truth is I have a good mind to have the maidenhead of this girl." 

He was, however, the "more troubled to see how my wife is by this 

means likely forever to have her hand over me, and that I shall 

forever be a slave to her--that is to say, only in matters of 

pleasure." At the same time his love for his wife was by no means 

diminished, nor hers for him. "I must here remark," he says, 

"that I have lain with my moher [i.e., _muger_, wife] as a 

husband more times since this falling out than in, I believe, 

twelve months before. And with more pleasure to her than in all 

the time of our marriage before." The next day was Sunday. On 

Monday Pepys at once begins to make inquiries which will put him 

on the track of Deb. On the 18th he finds her. She gets up into 

the coach with him, and he kisses her and takes liberties with 

her, at the same time advising her "to have a care of her honor 

and to fear God," allowing no one else to do what he has done; he 

also tells her how she can find him if she desires. Pepys now 

feels that everything is settled satisfactorily, and his heart 

is full of joy. But his joy is short-lived, for Mrs. Pepys 

discovers this interview with Deb on the following day. Pepys 

denies it at first, then confesses, and there is a more furious 

scene than ever. Pepys is now really alarmed, for his wife 

threatens to leave him; he definitely abandons Deb, and with 

prayers to God resolves never to do the like again. Mrs. Pepys is 

not satisfied, however, till she makes her husband write a letter 

to Deb, telling her that she is little better than a whore, and 

that he hates her, though Deb is spared this, not by any 

stratagem of Pepys, but by the considerateness of the friend to 

whom the letter was entrusted for delivery. Moreover, Mrs. Pepys 

arranges with her husband that, in future, whenever he goes 

abroad he shall be accompanied everywhere by his clerk. We see 

that Mrs. Pepys plays with what appears to be triumphant skill 

and success the part of the jealous and avenging wife, and digs 

her little French heels remorselessly into her prostrate husband 

and her rival. Unfortunately, we do not know what the final 

outcome was, for a little later, owing to trouble with his 


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