Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

animal stupidity. A man who, by nature, that is by his hereditary 

constitution, is jealous is certain to poison his own life and 

that of his wife. Such men ought on no account to marry. Both 

education and selection should work together to eliminate 

jealousy as far as possible from the human brain." 

 

Eric Gillard in an article on "Jealousy" (_Free Review_, Sept., 

1896), in opposition to those who believe that jealousy "makes 

the home," declares that, on the contrary, it is the chief force 

that unmakes the home. "So long as egotism waters it with the 

tears of sentiment and shields it from the cold blasts of 

scientific inquiry, so long will it thrive. But the time will 

come when it will be burned in the Garden of Love as a noxious 

weed. Its mephitic influence in society is too palpable to be 

overlooked. It turns homes that might be sanctuaries of love into 

hells of discord and hate; it causes suicides, and it drives 

thousands to drink, reckless excesses, and madness. Makes the 

home! One of your married men friends sees a probable seducer in 

every man who smiles at his wife; another is jealous of his 

wife's women acquaintances; a third is wounded because his wife 

shows so much attention to the children. Some of the women you 

know display jealousy of every other woman, of their husband's 

acquaintances, and some, of his very dog. You must be completely 

monopolized or you do not thoroughly love. You must admire no one 

but the person with whom you have immured yourself for life. Old 

friendships must be dissolved, new friendships must not be 

formed, for fear of invoking the beautiful emotion that 'makes 

the home.'" 

 

Even if jealousy in matters of sex could be admitted to be an emotion 

working on the side of civilized progress, it must still be pointed out 

that it merely acts externally; it can have little or no real influence; 

the jealous person seldom makes himself more lovable by his jealousy and 

frequently much less lovable. The main effect of his jealousy is to 

increase, and not seldom to excite, the causes for jealousy, and at the 

same time to encourage hypocrisy. 

 

All the circumstances, accompaniments, and results of domestic 

jealousy in their completely typical form, are well illustrated 

by a very serious episode in the history of the Pepys household, 

and have been fully and faithfully set down by the great diarist. 

The offence--an embrace of his wife's lady-help, as she might now 

be termed--was a slight one, but, as Pepys himself admits, quite 

inexcusable. He is writing, being in his thirty-sixth year, on 

the 25th of Oct., 1668 (Lord's Day). "After supper, to have my 

hair combed by Deb, which occasioned the greatest sorrow to me 

that ever I knew in this world, for my wife, coming up suddenly, 

did find me embracing the girl.... I was at a wonderful loss upon 

it, and the girl also, and I endeavored to put it off, but my 

wife was struck mute and grew angry.... Heartily afflicted for 

this folly of mine.... So ends this month," he writes a few days 

later, "with some quiet to my mind, though not perfect, after the 

greatest falling out with my poor wife, and through my folly with 

the girl, that ever I had, and I have reason to be sorry and 

ashamed of it, and more to be troubled for the poor girl's sake. 

Sixth November. Up, and presently my wife up with me, which she 

professedly now do every day to dress me, that I may not see 

Willet [Deb], and do eye me, whether I cast my eye upon her, or 


Page 3 from 5:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   Forward