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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

very specially in chronic alcoholics.[415] It is worthy of note that the 

supreme artists and masters of the human heart who have most consummately 

represented the tragedy of jealousy clearly recognized that it is either 

atavistic or pathological; Shakespeare made his Othello a barbarian, and 

Tolstoy made the Pozdnischeff of his _Kreutzer Sonata_ a lunatic. It is an 

anti-social emotion, though it has been maintained by some that it has 

been the cause of chastity and fidelity. Gesell, for instance, while 

admitting its anti-social character and accumulating quotations in 

evidence of the torture and disaster it occasions, seems to think that it 

still ought to be encouraged in order to foster sexual virtues. Very 

decided opinions have been expressed in the opposite sense. Jealousy, like 

other shadows, says Ellen Key, belongs only to the dawn and the setting of 

love, and a man should feel that it is a miracle, and not his right, if 

the sun stands still at the zenith.[416] 

 

Even therefore if jealousy has been a beneficial influence at the 

beginning of civilization, as well as among animals,--as may probably be 

admitted, though on the whole it seems rather to be the by-product of a 

beneficial influence than such an influence itself,--it is still by no 

means clear that it therefore becomes a desirable emotion in more advanced 

stages of civilization. There are many primitive emotions, like anger and 

fear, which we do not think it desirable to encourage in complex civilized 

societies but rather seek to restrain and control, and even if we are 

inclined to attribute an original value to jealousy, it seems to be among 

these emotions that it ought to be placed. 

 

Miss Clapperton, in discussing this problem (_Scientific 

Meliorism_, pp. 129-137), follows Darwin (_Descent of Man_, Part 

I, Ch. IV) in thinking that jealousy led to "the inculcation of 

female virtue," but she adds that it has also been a cause of 

woman's subjection, and now needs to be eliminated. "To rid 

ourselves as rapidly as may be of jealousy is essential; 

otherwise the great movement in favor of equality of sex will 

necessarily meet with checks and grave obstruction." 

 

Ribot (_La Logique des Sentiments_, pp. 75 et seq.; _Essai sur 

les Passions_, pp. 91, 175), while stating that subjectively the 

estimate of jealousy must differ in accordance with the ideal of 

life held, considers that objectively we must incline to an 

unfavorable estimate "Even a brief passion is a rupture in the 

normal life; it is an abnormal, if not a pathological state, an 

excrescence, a parasitism." 

 

Forel (_Die Sexuelle Frage_, Ch. V) speaks very strongly in the 

same sense, and considers that it is necessary to eliminate 

jealousy by non-procreation of the jealous. Jealousy is, he 

declares, "the worst and unfortunately the most deeply-rooted of 

the 'irradiations,' or, better, the 'contrast-reactions,' of 

sexual love inherited from our animal ancestors. An old German 

saying, 'Eifersucht ist eine Leidenschaft die mit Eifer sucht was 

Leider schafft,' says by no means too much.... Jealousy is a 

heritage of animality and barbarism; I would recall this to those 

who, under the name of 'injured honor,' attempt to justify it and 

place it on a high pedestal. An unfaithful husband is ten times 

more to be wished for a woman than a jealous husband.... We often 

hear of 'justifiable jealousy.' I believe, however, that there is 

no justifiable jealousy; it is always atavistic or else 

pathological; at the best it is nothing more than a brutal 


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