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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

All the tendencies of our civilized life are, in personal matters, towards 

individualism; they involve the specialization, and they ensure the 

sacredness, of personal habits and even peculiarities. This individualism 

cannot be broken down suddenly at the arbitrary dictation of a tradition, 

or even by the force of passion from which the restraints have been 

removed. Out of deference to the conventions and prejudices of their 

friends, or out of the reckless abandonment of young love, or merely out 

of a fear of hurting each other's feelings, young couples have often 

plunged prematurely into an unbroken intimacy which is even more 

disastrous to the permanency of marriage than the failure ever to reach a 

complete intimacy at all. That is one of the chief reasons why most 

writers on the moral hygiene of marriage nowadays recommend separate beds 

for the married couple, if possible separate bedrooms, and even sometimes, 

with Ellen Key, see no objection to their living in separate houses. 

Certainly the happiest marriages have often involved the closest and most 

unbroken intimacy, in persons peculiarly fitted for such intimacy. It is 

far from true that, as Bloch has affirmed, familiarity is fatal to love. 

It is deadly to a love that has no roots, but it is the nourishment of the 

deeply-rooted love. Yet it remains true that absence is needed to maintain 

the keen freshness and fine idealism of love. "Absence," as Landor said, 

"is the invisible and incorporeal mother of ideal beauty." The married 

lovers who are only able to meet for comparatively brief periods between 

long absences have often experienced in these meetings a life-long 

succession of honeymoons.[410] 

 

 

There can be no question that as presence has its risks for love, so also 

has absence. Absence like presence, in the end, if too prolonged, effaces 

the memory of love, and absence, further, by the multiplied points of 

contact with the world which it frequently involves, introduces the 

problem of jealousy, although, it must be added, it is difficult indeed to 

secure a degree of association which excludes jealousy or even the 

opportunities for motives of jealousy. The problem of jealousy is so 

fundamental in the art of love that it is necessary at this point to 

devote to it a brief discussion. 

 

Jealousy is based on fundamental instincts which are visible at the 

beginning of animal life. Descartes defined jealousy as "a kind of fear 

related to a desire to preserve a possession." Every impulse of 

acquisition in the animal world is stimulated into greater activity by the 

presence of a rival who may snatch beforehand the coveted object. This 

seems to be a fundamental fact in the animal world; it has been a 

life-conserving tendency, for, it has been said, an animal that stood 

aside while its fellows were gorging themselves with food, and experienced 

nothing but pure satisfaction in the spectacle, would speedily perish. But 

in this fact we have the natural basis of jealousy.[411] 

 

It is in reference to food that this impulse appears first and most 

conspicuously among animals. It is a well-known fact that association 

with other animals induces an animal to eat much more than when kept by 

himself. He ceases to eat from hunger but eats, as it has been put, in 

order to preserve his food from rivals in the only strong box he knows. 

The same feeling is transferred among animals to the field of sex. And 

further in the relations of dogs and other domesticated animals to their 

masters the emotion of jealousy is often very keenly marked.[412] 

 

Jealousy is an emotion which is at its maximum among animals, among 

savages,[413] among children,[414] in the senile, in the degenerate, and 


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