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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

(_Traite de l'Impuissance_, pp. 151-3) is the time for coitus, 

and even if desire is greater in the evening, pleasure is greater 

in the morning. Osiander also advised early morning coitus, and 

Venette, in an earlier century, discussing "at what hour a man 

should amorously embrace his wife" (_La Generation de l'Homme_, 

Part II, Ch. V), while thinking it is best to follow inclination, 

remarks that "a beautiful woman looks better by sunlight than by 

candlelight." A few authorities, like Burdach, have been content 

to accept the custom of night coitus, and Busch (_Das 

Geschlechtsleben des Weibes_, vol. i, p. 214) was inclined to 

think the darkness of night the most "natural" time, while 

Fuerbringer (Senator and Kaminer, _Health and Disease in Relation 

to Marriage_, vol. i, p. 217) thinks that early morning is 

"occasionally" the best time. 

 

To some, on the other hand, the exercise of sexual intercourse in 

the sunlight and the open air seems so important that they are 

inclined to elevate it to the rank of a religious exercise. I 

quote from a communication on this point received from Australia: 

"This shameful thing that must not be spoken of or done (except 

in the dark) will some day, I believe, become the one religious 

ceremony of the human race, in the spring. (Oh, what springs!) 

People will have become very sane, well-bred, aristocratic (all 

of them aristocrats), and on the whole opposed to rites and 

superstitions, for they will have a perfect knowledge of the 

past. The coition of lovers in the springtime will be the one 

religious ceremony they will allow themselves. I have a vision 

sometimes of the holy scene, but I am afraid it is too beautiful 

to describe. 'The intercourse of the sexes, I have dreamed, is 

ineffably beautiful, too fair to be remembered,' wrote the chaste 

Thoreau. Verily human beauty, joy, and love will reach their 

divinest height during those inaugural days of springtide 

coupling. When the world is one Paradise, the consummation of the 

lovers, the youngest and most beautiful, will take place in 

certain sacred valleys in sight of thousands assembled to witness 

it. For days it will take place in these valleys where the sun 

will rise on a dream of passionate voices, of clinging human 

forms, of flowers and waters, and the purple and gold of the 

sunrise are reflected on hills illumined with pansies. [I know 

not if the writer recalled George Chapman's "Enamelled pansies 

used at nuptials still"], and repeated on golden human flesh and 

human hair. In these sacred valleys the subtle perfume of the 

pansies will mingle with the divine fragrance of healthy naked 

young women and men in the spring coupling. You and I shall not 

see that, but we may help to make it possible." This rhapsody (an 

unconscious repetition of Saint-Lambert's at Mlle. Quinault's 

table in the eighteenth century) serves to illustrate the revolt 

which tends to take place against the unnatural and artificial 

degradation of the sexual act. 

 

In some parts of the world it has seemed perfectly natural and 

reasonable that so great and significant an act as that of coitus 

should be consecrated to the divinity, and hence arose the custom 

of prayer before sexual intercourse. Thus Zoroaster ordained that 

a married couple should pray before coitus, and after the act 

they should say together: "O, Sapondomad, I trust this seed to 

thee, preserve it for me, for it is a man." In the Gorong 

Archipelago it is customary also for husband and wife to pray 


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