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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Warker, who studied forty-two women of the community without 

finding any undue prevalence of reproductive diseases, nor could 

he find any diseased condition attributable to the sexual habits 

of the community (cf. C. Reed, _Text-Book of Gynecology_, 1901, 

p. 9). 

 

Noyes believed that "male continence" had never previously been a 

definitely recognized practice based on theory, though there 

might have been occasional approximation to it. This is probably 

true if the coitus is _reservatus_ in the full sense, with 

complete absence of emission. Prolonged coitus, however, 

permitting the woman to have orgasm more than once, while the man 

has none, has long been recognized. Thus in the seventeenth 

century Zacchia discussed whether such a practice is legitimate 

(_Zacchiae Quaestionum Opus_, ed. of 1688, lib. vii, tit. iii, 

quaest. VI). In modern times it is occasionally practiced, without 

any theory, and is always appreciated by the woman, while it 

appears to have no bad effect on the man. In such a case it will 

happen that the act of coitus may last for an hour and a quarter 

or even longer, the maximum of the woman's pleasure not being 

reached until three-quarters of an hour have passed; during this 

period the woman will experience orgasm some four or five times, 

the man only at the end. It may occasionally happen that a little 

later the woman again experiences desire, and intercourse begins 

afresh in the same way. But after that she is satisfied, and 

there is no recurrence of desire. 

 

It may be desirable at this point to refer briefly to the chief 

variations in the method of effecting coitus in their 

relationship to the art of love and the attainment of adequate 

and satisfying detumescence. 

 

The primary and essential characteristic of the specifically 

human method of coitus is the fact that it takes place face to 

face. The fact that in what is usually considered the typically 

normal method of coitus the woman lies supine and the man above 

her is secondary. Psychically, this front-to-front attitude 

represents a great advance over the quadrupedal method. The two 

partners reveal to each other the most important, the most 

beautiful, the most expressive sides of themselves, and thus 

multiply the mutual pleasure and harmony of the intimate act of 

union. Moreover, this face-to-face attitude possesses a great 

significance, in the fact that it is the outward sign that the 

human couple has outgrown the animal sexual attitude of the 

hunter seizing his prey in the act of flight, and content to 

enjoy it in that attitude, from behind. The human male may be 

said to retain the same attitude, but the female has turned 

round; she has faced her partner and approached him, and so 

symbolizes her deliberate consent to the act of union. 

 

The human variations in the exercise of coitus, both individual 

and national, are, however, extremely numerous. "To be quite 

frank," says Fuerbringer (Senator and Kaminer, _Health and Disease 

in Relation to Marriage_, vol. i, p. 213), "I can hardly think of 

any combination which does not figure among my case-notes as 

having been practiced by my patients." We must not too hastily 

conclude that such variations are due to vicious training. That 

is far from being the case. They often occur naturally and 

spontaneously. Freud has properly pointed out (in the second 

series of his _Beitraege zur Neurosenlehre_, "Bruchstueck" etc.) 


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